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Thread: Newton E30 edge sander

  1. #16
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    1. Need to size for both, so if the main is 3 and the oscillation is 1/3 I would get a 4hp
    2. Independent, start the VFD 1st (obviously) then one or the other then the other one...
    3. Not sure on that


    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Charles View Post
    Hopefully, these follow-up question is not too far off track:
    1. When sizing for multiple motors, is is sufficient to size for the larger? Or does one size for the combined? (Understood that in this application, the 1/3 hp oscillation motor effect is probably negligible).
    2. When using a single VFD for 2 motors, can they be independently switched? Or must start/stop simultaneously?
    3. Any cautions on ramp up/ramp down speeds when programming?

    Thanks. I have learned something today.

  2. #17
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    Got him down to $800, don’t think he will down from there. Honestly my biggest issue is dealing with it, i need to rent a trailer drive 1.5 hr get it loaded by myself (I don’t have any friends...) weighs like 900 pds then get it up my steep drive and turn around somehow with out rolling down the mountain and still need to get a vfd... And I am still dealing with the issues of my new Felder equipment that they are taking their sweet slow time to resolve... ok now I am just whining like a big spoiled baby...

    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    They are great little Sanders. Mostly made from off the shelf parts, super simple machines. They fetch about 1800 for a plug and play machine on the used retail end.

  3. #18
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    Yes, you are whining. Rent a couple friends and go get it!

  4. #19
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    Matt offers sage counsel. Too many times I have hesitated going to get a tool that I wanted & was a fair price only to find that once I was ready to commit, someone less had already purchased it. If you really do want it, don't make that mistake as I doubt that a sander such as this comes along.

  5. #20
    900 pounds isn't heavy.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    900 pounds isn't heavy.
    I have a friend that obliterated three of his fingertips doing flys with 65lb dumb bells. He thought the floor was clear of weights. Dropped the dumb bell on top of another with fingers between. Three fingertips had to be sewn back on. 65 lbs isnít heavy either.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by John Sincerbeaux View Post
    I have a friend that obliterated three of his fingertips doing flys with 65lb dumb bells. He thought the floor was clear of weights. Dropped the dumb bell on top of another with fingers between. Three fingertips had to be sewn back on. 65 lbs isn’t heavy either.
    900 pounds still isn't very heavy.

  8. #23
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    Everything is relative. Darcy is a pro but I'm just a hobby guy and moving 900 lb machinery is easy. I've moved 6000 lb machines and that is hard. A Johnson bar, a couple of dollys, a few pipes, or a pallet jack, and a couple of 4x4, and you are good to go. You can rent a drop deck trailer, or roll the machine up a ramp if you need to with a come a long to help. You can also take stuff off a pickup with an engine hoist. The point is, 900 lb machines can be moved without a lot of expensive equipment. Dollys are $30 each, pipes are cheap, and you can rent pallet jacks and hoists for that light of a load ( even they aren't expensive and have a million uses ). The hauling is another learning experience in life and the rewards are great. My first haul were three machines at 2000 lbs each from NC to WI which is like being thrown in the deep end of the pool but it got handled. You will find this machine is easy to deal with if you think it through. Dave

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    900 pounds still isn't very heavy.
    I say BS.... respectfully of course!
    Itís easy to say 900lbs isnít heavy when youíre not lifting it or have any skin in the game. A fork lift can make you feel pretty strong I guess?
    I would venture there are not many guys here that can bench press 1/3 of the weight of that sander? Anyone try picking up a 900lb motorcycle that is on itís side?

  10. #25
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    I agree 900lbs isnít ďheavyĒ if you have half a brain and are prepared with the proper equipment. My planer is 1200 and so is my jointer and I am really a hobby guy, unlike Dave K. ;-)

    If youíre used to lunchbox planers and benchtop stuff, yeah, 900lbs seems daunting. Point is, do some homework and get the right equipment (no, you donít need a forklift) and youíll be able to handle it.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Sincerbeaux View Post
    I would venture there are not many guys here that can bench press 1/3 of the weight of that sander?
    You clearly donít have any experience moving big machines and are missing the point. No one here is going to manhandle 900lbs with bare hands. One must use mechanical advantage, wheels (and pipes) and hydraulics, and most importantly brains.

  12. #27
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    I saw that one for sale, been looking for a slightly smaller edge sander, was just a bit short for what I want, but a nice looking unit. found a video of one working, slick.

    900 pounds is easy, just have to think it through. A neighbor with a 30hp tractor with a loader could easily lift it off the trailer. I paid a Home Depot driver to lift a 3300# shaper off my trailer that my tractor could not handle. $50 and he set it inside my shop, rolled on pipes from there.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    You clearly donít have any experience moving big machines and are missing the point. No one here is going to manhandle 900lbs with bare hands. One must use mechanical advantage, wheels (and pipes) and hydraulics, and most importantly brains.
    Matt, ďyou clearlyĒ donít know me.
    All my machines are north of 2000 lbs with the heaviest being 3000 lbs. Iíve moved all of them with every method from by hand to by forklift.
    I never said that it canít be done or it would be hard. I just think itís kinda disingenuous to say 900lbs isnít heavy to the average woodworker who doesnít own a forklift.

  14. #29
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    An engine hoist can take the place of a forklift and a lot cheaper. Mineís paid for itself.

    Agreed, you need some supplies to do it but I think the general point is not to give up on it because itís a little ďheavyĒ. And you donít need a forklift.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by John Sincerbeaux View Post
    I say BS.... respectfully of course!
    It’s easy to say 900lbs isn’t heavy when you’re not lifting it or have any skin in the game. A fork lift can make you feel pretty strong I guess?
    I would venture there are not many guys here that can bench press 1/3 of the weight of that sander? Anyone try picking up a 900lb motorcycle that is on it’s side?
    I have moved stuff that weighs 6k pounds by myself with no forklift, only simple tools.

    I have pushed 10k pound machines through buildings with no forklift.

    Levers, fulcrum, rollers. Simple stuff.

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