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Thread: Out with the old, in with the...

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    49,870
    I don't feel bad at all about taking out the formal miter bench. I'm not giving up the tool because it does have a purpose, but going "portable" makes sense. This stand has a quick release setup for the saw and folds down, so I can move it anywhere, including upstairs where my lumber rack is located. I bought the wheels for convenience along the same lines. So for a hundred bucks, I still have the utility of the miter saw without the permanent "suckage" of shop space. . This thing is very stable and got decent reviews for a light duty solution...which exactly is my need.

    IMG_5625.jpg IDLU6488.jpg
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,745
    I have a very hard time giving up natural light (even put skylights in my shop), especially as I age. Also have had good experience with those 'light tube' bubble skylights to fit into tight areas. Will be interesting to learn the degree reducing those windows impact indirect light in other parts of the shop. I do get the need for more wall space and have that same constraint. On one window I hang my clamps, not the greatest location but there is still considerable light let in.

    I also have a long bench along one wall that started out as a miter station. It didnt last long, and now has a small spindle sander on one end, then sharpening station, then a benchtop 10" bandsaw on the other end. Much more use, and am sure you will adapt to the space you need the most. I tend to prioritize processes that I use often, over some ideal setup that is rarely used.

    I have a small battery circ saw that breaks down longer pieces, which then go on the slider (although I do tend to leave the outrigger in place). Every now and then I wish I had a dedicated miter station, but its rare so not worth the real estate. My miter saw still gets used a fair bit outside of the shop.

    Given you already have a large opening with structure (header) in place, pretty much anything is fair game for that window. You might try the building surplus centers if you need cheap double paned windows and dont need exact sizes.

    Thanks for posting, always interesting to see what others experience is, look forward to the 3mo update after some time using the new config.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,870
    Revisiting this to show you kinda how things pan out upon "completion". My MFT is going to be used temporarily in the place where a dedicated bench for guitar work will go...it's wider and a little shorter, but for the moment it at least provides a surface that isn't my main bench. I upgraded to a much nicer (and larger) monitor for the CNC control machine and wall mounted it. For the last year and a quarter, I had the whole computer system on a mobile "stand up" stand thinking that being able to move it about would be convenient, but actual use dictated that it pretty much stayed in exactly the same place the whole time. So to get rid of cables crossing the floor, the CPU moved under the CNC and the new monitor is, as mentioned, wall mounted with wireless keyboard and rodent to support. That red tool box will eventually go away when I get another nice black multi-drawer tool cabinet for under the area where the monitor, keyboard and mouse are...'just waiting on a good deal. I wanted to snap up another one of the larger, black Husky units like I have now, but the current version is 24" deep vs the 18" deep that I have as well as a hundred bucks more expensive and with a power strip on the right side that would be essentially unusable. I'll find something more modest when the time is right. At any rate, I have just a little more cleanup to do and can get back to some planned projects. This little shop work, however, has been transformational in both physical space reclamation and a greater sense of space, too.



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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,169
    That turned out really nice. Looks very organized and open. Like the CNC monitor station on the wall too.

    Well done Jim!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,870
    I just can't believe how much this project has "freed" things up, Greg.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,670
    Blog Entries
    11
    My MS station has always been somewhat compromised due to lack of space. I had to angle it so long stock could fit out the door. Not too long ago I added a Kreg fence system with an accurate stop so I can cut to length without using a tape measure. I find it most useful. I like to be able to walk up to a machine to do an operation without having to do any set up. Exception is breaking down sheet goods with my track saw. Last week I took out my old Milwaukee 10" chop saw and replaced with with a 12" Dewalt 715 so I could cut 8" wide stock. That required some tweaking, but I finished it in time to cut all of the pieces for the last four Adirondack chairs. Loving it. CNC eh? That would have been sweet for cutting all of the Michigan mitt shaped chair back pieces. Problem with a basement shop is no windows. But I get your need to reclaim wall space. I have flat run out. One issue I see you will have is no longer having big time dust collection for your miter saw.
    NOW you tell me...

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