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Thread: Project: Large Natural Edge Black Walnut Dining Table Top

  1. #16
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    That's a good question, Prashun...the fact of the matter is that the wide belt sander is more efficient at final leveling. Yes, one can get a nice surface using the ROS with coarse through fine abrasives, but it's not going to be as flat as coming off the wide belt. The other thing here is that there is still a minor dip in the surface near the knots. These passes through the sander will absolutely take care of that. Using a ROS would mean there would still be a minor dip, although it would be smooth. That kind of thing is absolutely going to be visible once a finish goes on. The sander that BCH has (a really old-iron monstrosity) doesn't leave much marking, honestly. They process slabs on it daily for their own creations and then finish sand with Festool ROS just like I would.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    Beautiful work! I love the idea of putting a radius on the end. I've been struggling with what to do with the ends of a couple of live edge tables I'm working on for my home. I didn't like the idea of a harsh, hard edge and this idea looks to be a perfect solution.

  3. #18
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    Scott, do a mock up using cardboard or whatever. It doesn't have to be full scale...just proportional. You can work it out that way first and fine the best balance for the radius vs the shape of the table.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Scott, do a mock up using cardboard or whatever. It doesn't have to be full scale...just proportional. You can work it out that way first and fine the best balance for the radius vs the shape of the table.
    Great idea! Plus, that lets met get approval from the boss before I commit to a cut.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Brader View Post
    Great idea! Plus, that lets met get approval from the boss before I commit to a cut.
    That second part is most critical...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    Well, my participation relative to the table top is now complete...sanded at BCH and the ends now have the subtle radius on them. Here are a few photos of today's endeavors.


    First the bottom got run. I thought it would be a single pass, but it got three light ones
    IMG_5594.jpg

    After a run through, the slab is passed over the machine for its next trip. Despite the weight it's honestly the most efficient way to do things because carrying it around the machine and building column is a long trip
    IMG_5595.jpg

    The top got four passes and the total reduction in thickness was about .0625" (1/16") more or less, making the final table thickness to be just a hair under 2". The cost for this work to my client was "extremely minimal" and worth the trip since it saves hours of hand sanding. The abrasive on the back side of the machine is 120, so a quick pass with 100 on a ROS and then up through the grits will take a lot less time than had my client had to start with the rough surface off the Lucas mill router flattening.
    IMG_5596.jpg

    Once we brought it back to my shop, the last step was to do the subtle radius on the ends. I had previously cut a template with the CNC that provided a nominal 1" difference on the ark from the edges. A line was struck with a white pencil using the template and I cut close to the line with a jigsaw and an aggressive blade. The template was then clamped back on the workpiece right at the line.

    IMG_5597.jpg


    And then this bad boy/girl was use to clean the edge...very long, top bearing, .5" straight cutter
    IMG_5600.jpg

    Resulting in a whole lot of very fluffy shavings that never made it close to the extractor pickup...
    IMG_5601.jpg

    And...it looks great
    IMG_5598.jpg

    Of course, it's going to live here for a few days until my client can come back with a truck or trailer to haul it back to somewhere in the wilds of New Jersey. I need the space to work on other things!
    IMG_5599.jpg

    As I mentioned, my work fabricating the top for the client is done, but I'm assisting with getting the steel legs based on some photos that were provided to me quoted from a couple of welders. I drew up the initial design and have a small modification to do before it's sent out for quoting.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #22
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    It's a beauty!! I really like the radius on the ends and hope you are able to keep the photos coming as this goes along. Love to see what the plans are for the metal base.

  8. #23
    Looking good! That radius idea is great.

  9. #24
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    That's beautiful, Jim!

  10. #25
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    Ted, I fully expect the client to provide me with photos once the whole project is done for sure...and I'll certainly add them to this thread at that time. I'll also post a base drawing excerpt once I make a few small changes based on my client's requests this morning.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    Looking good! That radius idea is great.
    I have to thank Brian Holcolmbe for that idea...it was his first.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #27
    Looks great Jim! Hopefully you got to keep the offcuts

    Out of curiosity, do you mind if I ask what it cost to run the slab through the sander, just as a point of reference?

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  13. #28
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    Looks Great...
    Army Veteran 1968 - 1970
    NRA Lifetime Member
    I Support the Second Amendment of the US Constitution

  14. #29
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    Christopher, the flattening on the Lucas mill was about $150. The final sanding (more passes than I expected "just because") was under $50.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
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    Goleta / Santa Barbara
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    re the radius - great idea. Brian Holcombe has an exquisite eye for very tasteful and subtle detail that adds so much.

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