Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 32

Thread: Rust prevention

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Jacksonville, Fl
    Posts
    27

    Rust prevention

    I have read alot of different things about rust prevention on the boards. I have a question about paste wax, everything I have read says apply it to help protect against rust.

    How is everyone applying it, by hand with a rag and then using some sort of buffer to polish the surface?

    What have you found to be the best way to apply?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    261
    I just apply with a rag and hand buff with a clean rag when dry. It takes a little time, but I find it enjoyable when I'm too tired to actually work on a project.

  3. #3
    I apply paste wax with a 0000 steel wool pad or a rag. I wipe it off as soon as I get the saw table coated.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    418
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I apply paste wax with a 0000 steel wool pad or a rag. I wipe it off as soon as I get the saw table coated.
    I do the same thing as Lee, but substitute a 3M red scotch pad for the steel wool.

    David

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Jacksonville, Fl
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    I just apply with a rag and hand buff with a clean rag when dry. It takes a little time, but I find it enjoyable when I'm too tired to actually work on a project.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I apply paste wax with a 0000 steel wool pad or a rag. I wipe it off as soon as I get the saw table coated.
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    I do the same thing as Lee, but substitute a 3M red scotch pad for the steel wool.

    David

    Thanks for the info

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    162
    I use renaissance wax applied/wiped off with a rag, i find it superior to reg past wax. Easier to apply/remove and seems to prevent rust better. It also last longer as a slip agent on my planer/jointer bed.

    I never clean between applications unless there is rust, each application will just continue to polish surface.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,633
    Blog Entries
    1
    Johnson Floor Wax keeps the rust off my tools in Dickinson, Galveston County Texas.
    One can will last 10-15 years. This is in a wet climate.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    171
    I use automotive grade wax. Was ripping some wood the other night and the drops just slide back towards me effortlessly.
    I think last time I did it I also used the steel wool trick as well, as in applied it with steel wool.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Blighton View Post
    I have read alot of different things about rust prevention on the boards. I have a question about paste wax, everything I have read says apply it to help protect against rust.

    How is everyone applying it, by hand with a rag and then using some sort of buffer to polish the surface?

    What have you found to be the best way to apply?
    I use CRC 3 36, let it "dry" overnight, wipe it down, then (I use to) apply Johnson's Paste Wax, let it skim over for about a half hour or so, and wipe it smooth vigorously with a clean rag, and repeat this several times as needed to get the right texture. It's a bit "sticky", so more recently I've been using Butchers Bowling Alley wax, and it is less so.

    Some people (manufacturers even) recommend baby powder, but that stuff can contain trace quantities of asbestos (as has recently come to light) so I wouldn't recommend it in a shop with strong air circulation, ahem.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,020
    In my cliamte my wood does not rust. I have never used ironwood.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,517
    Quote Originally Posted by Jak Kelly View Post
    I use automotive grade wax. Was ripping some wood the other night and the drops just slide back towards me effortlessly.
    I think last time I did it I also used the steel wool trick as well, as in applied it with steel wool.
    Automotive waxes and anything else containing silicone is banned from my shop. Silicone is next to impossible to completely remove once it gets on something. When it gets on your wood it will create major problems when it comes time to apply finish (stain, polyurethane, etc.). The finish will develop fish eyes wherever the silicone is. Sorry to bring you the bad news.

    I use Johnson's Paste Wax, applied with a rag. I wax all cast iron about 2X a year, and more frequently on the table surfaces, sometimes every few weeks when using my tools a lot. It helps the wood slide on the tables easily. I also wax my router bases, dovetail jig, M&T jig, and even lubricate the ways and gears of my Unisaw with it. For this, I apply it hick with an old tooth brush. The wax surface develops a hardened crust and does not collect saw dust like petroleum lubricants do, yet stays soft and remains stuck to the ways and gears to keep them moving smoothly. One can lasts me about 6 years. My shop is air conditioned, but only when I'm working there, or when the temperature drops below freezing the unit is a heat pump, so it keeps my shop temperature above freezing in the Winter, to keep my batteries, paints, etc. happy and condensation to a minimum. I have no rust problems in my shop, and it's about 4' above and less than 60' from a 250 acre lake.

    Charley
    Last edited by Charles Lent; 09-21-2019 at 10:42 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    30
    How about if the TS top already has some rust spots on it? Best way to get it out, and smooth, prior to doing the Johnson's wax treatment? I know about using jelly, but assuming there's a better way?

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Burson View Post
    How about if the TS top already has some rust spots on it? Best way to get it out, and smooth, prior to doing the Johnson's wax treatment? I know about using jelly, but assuming there's a better way?
    I use a "sandflex hand block", which you can find on amazon, which acts like an eraser for rust spots. Start with the "fine" one, coarser as necessary. Klingspor Abrasives is the manufacturer.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Burson View Post
    How about if the TS top already has some rust spots on it? Best way to get it out, and smooth, prior to doing the Johnson's wax treatment? I know about using jelly, but assuming there's a better way?
    For a full clean i use bar keepers friend with some water and red scotchbrite, clean that up with simple green untill the rag is clean then wipe with denatured alcohol then renaissance wax, you will be amazed at the results...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    308
    I clean with orange glow. Then, first apply light oil with a green scotch brite pad. Then rub down with pure talcum powder using a chalk board eraser. Then Johnsons paste wax if I won't be using the machine for several days. I don't buff off the wax until ready to use. In between daily usage, I just keep the sawdust off and maybe rub the eraser across it with just the talc that's in it. It's very humid here and my shop is unconditioned with no insulation. No rust on any of my machines.

    Use talc sparingly. It is also a good lubricant for ways and fences.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •