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Thread: Tablesaw dust collection hood

  1. #16
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    Carl,

    I also recently got a CU300 Smart. I am using a temporary 4" from my 6" drop to the saw port, until I have time to hook up some 5" pipe to the 6" drop. Works ok, but could be better. Haven't gotten around to the over the blade part yet, but I am wondering about using a shop vac to the small factory blade guard.

    Have you tried that yet? I will get around to trying it in about a month, but just wondering if you already have.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    Carl,

    I also recently got a CU300 Smart. I am using a temporary 4" from my 6" drop to the saw port, until I have time to hook up some 5" pipe to the 6" drop. Works ok, but could be better. Haven't gotten around to the over the blade part yet, but I am wondering about using a shop vac to the small factory blade guard.

    Have you tried that yet? I will get around to trying it in about a month, but just wondering if you already have.
    I have tried the factory guard to the 4" DC hookup. It was not great at all. I might try the shop vac direct for a test, but instead want to get something in place I can use long term so even if the shop vac worked it is not a long term solution.

  3. #18
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    The factory guard/pickup, which is likely the same as mine, is so narrow that it's largely ineffective for over head dust collection regardless of the drop size it's connected to. (I have a 3" drop to it) And because it's supported by the riving knife, it's only useable for through cuts. Trying a shop vac is worthy of the effort...maybe the better efficiency at high static pressure will get a little more action with the narrow guard.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
    I plan to do something like this:

    https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwor...dust-collector

    I think the collector is too wide but I like the fact that the arm is hinged to be folded out of the way when necessary. It looks like they used a 4 inch connection. I plan to use a 2.5 inch line - because my DC is only 2hp, not because I think it is better than 4 inch.

  5. #20
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    Carl...

    I had a little time today, and cut up some melamine shelving, so I decided to do a quick test with the shop vac. I first used the ShopSmith dust collector/shop vac that I have had for years. It is low pressure/high volume like a real DC. I hooked it up to the standard blade guard with 2 1/2" hose, along with the temporary 4" DC hose to the saw connection from my 3 HP DC.

    It did work better than just the bottom hookup, but not much better.

    Then I hooked my 6HP(?) ShopVac to the blade guard along with the DC to the cabinet. Hi pressure/low volume. It also worked better than just the DC, and a bit better than the ShopSmith Vac setup, but still nothing to write home about.

    So far, I have not tried anything that makes me want to make it into a permanent setup.

    That is all I will have time for. Working on a new addition, and going on an Alaska cruise next week. I will get back to it someday, but hopefully you will have it all figured out in the meantime.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    I will get back to it someday, but hopefully you will have it all figured out in the meantime.
    I hope your cruise is a LOOOONG one! (my projects progress slowly). Enjoy it, sounds fantastic!

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The factory guard/pickup, which is likely the same as mine, is so narrow that it's largely ineffective for over head dust collection regardless of the drop size it's connected to. (I have a 3" drop to it) And because it's supported by the riving knife, it's only useable for through cuts. Trying a shop vac is worthy of the effort...maybe the better efficiency at high static pressure will get a little more action with the narrow guard.
    Thanks for the calibration.

    Net net I am not going to spend any more time chasing a solution with the stock pickup. Time to get a proper solution in place, my lungs need it.

  8. #23
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    Waiting on parts for the blade guard/collection chute, which is kinda nice to finally be moving forward on something that has been overdue for some time.

    In the meantime yes, I did need better adapters to these port sizes. So just printed one on the printer, fits nice and snug. We will see how it holds up over time.

    Looking at these again in the background you can see sawdust, everywhere! The largest culprit is by far the tablesaw.

    20190928_141406_resized.jpg20190928_141411_resized.jpg

  9. #24
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    And why not, an embarrassing picture of just how much dust is all over my shop. I tend to setup in 'lanes' to crunch a lot of stuff in a tight space. This is the main working triangle from my bench to the layout/sanding table to the tablesaw. I wish I had a better place to store the unused raw material for a given project (I tend to hoard wood which takes up more storage space than I should allow - plus I see my son threw an extension cord in there). Although just thinking about this gives me an idea on a way that could resolve this very issue, would be fantastic to get unencumbered floor space left of the outrigger, if nothing else just to be able to walk around.

    Right above the saw is a ceiling mounted air filter. I am not sure to what degree it helps (and yes I have read some concerns that it actually hurts). I should probably get a particle meter once I get the really crude collection in place. I really do need to prioritize healthy lungs.

    20190928_145423_resized.jpg
    Last edited by Carl Beckett; 09-29-2019 at 7:11 AM.

  10. #25
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    Procured some pieces for the blade guard. I had to chuckle that they came in a box marked 'fragile'.

    It is a table saw blade guard. I hope it is not 'fragile'...



    More to come on this project...

    20191004_095737_resized (1).jpg

  11. #26
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    Don't underestimate what carriers can do even to "sturdy" things, Carl.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #27
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    Well, phase I is roughed in. I get the feeling this is going to change another few times before all said and done, but basic funtionality is in place.

    I liked the Grizzly guard/chute so just ordered that. And mounted it to a home made overhead boom. At the same time I split it to go to the jointer/planer, and/or the under table port. I think it is going to get a small flex section and a hinge, so it can be swung up/out of the way.

    Not sure how much is going to be in the way of what, figure I will learn that soon enough and modify from there. But I NEEDED to get something in place, the dust was bothering me so just hit the stop button until something was in place.

    At the same time I made a relay for the dust collector. I simply pigtailed a household light remote to a relay. Mounted the 110 receptacle in the same box as the relay, so if the remote ever bites it all that is needed is to plug in a new one same as any outlet.

    Still some bits and pieces to clean up, but it is functional, and am hoping my shop (and lungs) stay cleaner now.



    20191012_114421_resized.jpg20191012_114754_resized.jpg20191012_115403_resized.jpg
    Last edited by Carl Beckett; 10-12-2019 at 1:16 PM.

  13. #28
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    Nice!

    How much did the Grizzly parts cost? And what part numbers did you get?

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    Nice!

    How much did the Grizzly parts cost? And what part numbers did you get?
    Matt, I can PM you the list if you like, I simply went and picked each individual component off the replacement parts list. The grand total was about $230 so it all added up to where is was not that far from just buying the entire assembly. But I couldnt come up with a use of the overarm boom, so took the few $/shipping savings. For similar money I could have gotten a shark guard, but decided I wanted to mount overhead and not on the riving knife. The shark guard has a mounting kit for overhead, but I liked the grizzly 4 bar adjust ability and larger guard footprint. Its worth looking at shark guard as an option but again I didnt want to fall into paralysis analysis, just wanted 'something' - GO DO. Under a month from start to finish is pretty good progress by my standards.

    I turned a cylindrical block from hard maple to mount the pivot arm. Already I have simply slid the guard off to be able to rip small pieces, so that works ok (did not remove the hose, simply sat the guard on the table clear of everything. It may be, that this setup will push me to using the slider more effectively, which wouldnt be all bad because I still have some cabinet saw habits in me. These small rips I did are an example where they might have been done on the FF jig, and safer to do that way. Using the FF I would not have had to remove the guard.

    When I raise the guard it swings towards the back - the nature of the 4 bar mount. It still covers the blade but I might shift the mount forward depending on what height range is most used, since it seems dust is more apt to be thrown forward than back. Simple to redrill a hole for the pivot mount, although I might also add a sliding piece that lets it adjust front to back easily. Am expecting to tune this in via use.

    What I dont know is, how much that mount is going to get in the way when I cut a taller piece (even with blade guard off). It is not often I cut pieces very tall (I will measure what clearance is there), but sometimes (used to be tenoning but now I do tenoning with a different method). I can always slide the saw out from under if needed, or like others have done make the overarm hinge/slide out of the way, although I like the rigidity of what is there, it is pretty stiff/solid.

    Also I had visions of making side pieces for the guard that can swing down independently. Will see if that ever happens, I think it depends on how effective this is as is. It does not collect 100%, but does pretty well. And it seems like it is pulling up more of the fine particles (most important), what does escape seems to be larger particles (the larger mass) getting thrown out the front edge. Minor in comparison to the mess it made before, and I dont mind a few chips on the tabletop, it is that fine dust that FILLED the shop before that I needed to get rid of. I might take a piece of scrap walnut (if there is such an animal) and just make a bunch of cuts and see what the shop air does. Walnut in particular was bothering me, like furniture made with it but never liked the dust from it.

    Note I gave a good blow out/cleaning all through the underside of the saw. Dust had collected that looked like the underside of a cabinet saw - even though there has always been under blade collection it really wasnt effective. The ZCI I hope will help (made a temporary wooden one while some material is ordered for something better). Even the slider runners were full of sawdust. Bearings/runners, belts, gears, etc all do better without sawdust in them. With luck, better dust control means taking better care of the saw itself. And things look a little more tidy now.

    20191012_161503_resized.jpg

    I can now get back to woodworking...
    Last edited by Carl Beckett; 10-13-2019 at 6:34 AM.

  15. #30
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    That turned out to be a nice solution, Carl. I have to give this some thought as I'd like to do similar with my slider.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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