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Thread: Hanging EMT conduit in new shop.

  1. #16
    Jim,

    I've never used grey plastic indoors. Can that stuff be heated and bent? Or does everything need to be done with fittings? I like the ability to put multiple and compound bends into EMT. Gives it a really clean look without all the fittings.

    Michael

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    If your local code permits it, the grey plastic conduit is a lot easier to work with than the metallic.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    If your local code permits it, the grey plastic conduit is a lot easier to work with than the metallic. You do need to run separate grounds, however.

    I agree with the benefits of the surface mounted conduit because of the flexibility over time. While I initially wired my shop with wire in the walls, etc., pretty much all subsequent work was done using conduit. Should I ever move and setup a new shop, that lesson will follow me.
    But Jim, EMT is so much prettier. I love doing conduit work & I get almost as much satisfaction out of building a beautifully done rack of EMT as I do out of a piece of furniture.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Gantz View Post
    Jim,

    I've never used grey plastic indoors. Can that stuff be heated and bent? Or does everything need to be done with fittings? I like the ability to put multiple and compound bends into EMT. Gives it a really clean look without all the fittings.

    Michael
    Yes, it's heated and bent all the time.

    I would never use it inside a building, it sags between hangers, looks like yuk to me...............Rod.

  4. #19
    Well that just won't do....

    How am I supposed to present myself as a craftsmen if my conduit sags?

    Again, something I probably wouldn't have figured out until it was too late.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    I would never use it inside a building, it sags between hangers, looks like yuk to me...............Rod.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Yes, it's heated and bent all the time.

    I would never use it inside a building, it sags between hangers, looks like yuk to me...............Rod.
    I agree. Additionally, NFPA 70 table 352.30 specifies supports every 3' for 1/2" - 1" PVC compared to every 10' (358.30 B) for EMT

  6. #21
    Make your strut lengths long enough to carry your air lines too. I have a half dozen 10'x1 5/8" strut that I use for a temporary vertical support rack. I have some angle clips screwed to the rafters. With those I can anchor the strut vertically, add horizontal supports and it makes an upright square & level support at the elevation I choose to work at. I did a pretty large metal fence for the place and was able to fab up the 5x8 panels on the strut rack. It kept me off my knees and/or saved a lot of walk around time on a table. The rack takes 15 minutes to set up and about 10 to stow.

  7. #22
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    Have you considered going with 1/2" plywood on the walls and just clamping the EMT to the plywood?
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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Yes, it's heated and bent all the time.

    I would never use it inside a building, it sags between hangers, looks like yuk to me...............Rod.
    While I admittedly haven't use a lot of it, I've seen no sagging issues with the horizontal runs for my CNC machine and MiniSpit...but it's also supported every few feet and not carrying a heavy load inside. Any metal I have is only vertical runs.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Von Bickley View Post
    Have you considered going with 1/2" plywood on the walls and just clamping the EMT to the plywood?
    I did consider it. But I think finished drywall just gives a cleaner look.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Yes, it's heated and bent all the time.

    I would never use it inside a building, it sags between hangers, looks like yuk to me...............Rod.
    Nor should it be used exposed outdoors for long runs without the proper expansion joints. It expands & contracts like crazy with temp change.

  11. #26
    The advantage of the plywood is you can put light stuff almost anywhere on a wall. I set my plywood walls with a decent grade of ply set vertically. All of my power is down fed so I can be into any section of wall for mods in a short time. I was going to go with 10 ply but the cost led me to the 8 and a 2 with a belly band around the joint. I think it looks great, it takes a hit better than rock and it is a shop. Function first

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Gantz View Post
    I did consider it. But I think finished drywall just gives a cleaner look.
    I also did one shop in drywall, and the next in OSB. I would definitely pick OSB or plywood over the drywall. Stud locations become so much less important.

  13. #28
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    I think emt requires a ground wire anyway so no savings there over PVC.
    Bil lD.

  14. #29
    Local codes apply, but in NEC EMT can serve as equipment grounding conductor; no separate ground wire required. You do need a jumper from any receptacles ground terminal to the box unless receptacles are rated as self-grounding (and screw-on metal cover is used). Most new 120 receptacles are now self-grounding; but most 240 are not. If EMT is fed via romex, the ground wire in the romex must be bonded to the EMT.
    Last edited by Paul F Franklin; 09-18-2019 at 11:09 PM.

  15. #30
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    Please reconsider the drywall. I've had it both ways & currently have painted OSB. I would not want to go back to drywall. Plywood is more expensive, but would give you the clean look.

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