Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 21 of 21

Thread: Favorite technique for cutting a long, wide rabbet with the grain?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Joel David Katz View Post
    Resaw the maple, rip one of the pieces to the proper width, and then glue them together to form the rabbit.
    Not the most efficient Neanderthal technique. Ripping hard maple with a hand saw is not for the faint of heart. But knock yourself out.

    Oh, you meant to use a table saw? Cheat!!!

    Unless you actually meant your hand cranked band saw??? If so, I retract my comment.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    White Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by James Waldron View Post
    Not the most efficient Neanderthal technique. Ripping hard maple with a hand saw is not for the faint of heart. But knock yourself out.

    Oh, you meant to use a table saw? Cheat!!!

    Unless you actually meant your hand cranked band saw??? If so, I retract my comment.
    Didn't the OP say "This is for an interior trim project and I need to fit them around some framing lumber in the archway into my den." I strongly suspect this "framing lumber in the archway of my den" wasn't milled using hand tools. As such, my technique is an easy way to accomplish his goal regardless of the tools he chooses to resaw and and rip his seven foot boards.
    Last edited by Joel David Katz; 09-20-2019 at 7:37 PM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    7,915
    And...you lose the thickness of the saw's kerf
    no knot troubles.JPG
    My usual way..or.
    4 rebates done.JPG
    2 cuts on the tables saw...
    mid rail details.JPG
    Sometimes, I get a bit fancy...
    rail dry fit 1.JPG
    When I need to make a few rails....for frame and panel sides...

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    184
    Thanks for your help everyone. So after doing the first one all with the 10-1/4, I decided to try a variant of the technique Warren and Dave alluded to one the next two. Worked out much much faster.

    The gist is:
    - Score the final rebate depth and width shoulders with your marking gauges.
    - Take your plow plane with an iron slightly wider than the side of the mouth of a bench plane. (for cleanup)
    - Run a groove down the long face of the board just outside your score mark using your plow all the way to final depth.
    - Take you narrowest plow plane iron and run it down the jointed edge of the board just inside you score line. It need not be full depth (which is the final rabbet width) but if it is, good for you, you're done.

    You should now have a defined outer shoulder and an inner shoulder at depth. You have a couple choices at this point:
    - You can waste out the rest of the rabbet using a bench plane set super coarse. The groove you cut in the face will act as your depth stop since you chose a plow plane iron wider than the side mouth. I keep my number 6 with no camber at all on the iron so I did one this way (Full disclosure, that board was flat enough, I used the slider to help hog out some of the waste).

    - Your other choice is to take your biggest, coarsest rip saw and cut in the side of the board to cut out the rabbet all in one shot. I did one this way and it was faster. The main thing is you will get a lot of sawdust clogging the teeth since there's nowhere for the sawdust to go in the blind kerf.

    Either way, clean up with a rabbet plane at the very end. It was way faster sawing stuff out, but I still needed to cleanup a lot with the planes. But it was 10-15 mins vs 30 mins.


    IMG_20190920_093056.jpg
    IMG_20190920_111648.jpg
    IMG_20190920_113524.jpg
    IMG_20190920_115022.jpg

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    969
    Looks good. Nice work.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,806
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lawrence View Post
    Looks good. Nice work.
    Ditto

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •