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Thread: Flatten plane irons with less problems

  1. #1

    Flatten plane irons with less problems

    It has been suggested for many decades that to enable a plane to work at it's best requires the iron be flattened on both sides. This has led to many different meant to eliminate pressure point problems from using hands and fingers. Many a holder has been developed to overcome this aspect. However the actual mounting of the iron to a stable base has been a problem.
    To easily mount the iron to a stable base is actually easy if you follow this method that bespoke clock builders use to mount thin sheet stock for surface machining. First item needed is a solid metal block slightly larger than the surface to be surfaced and thick enough not to deflect from pressure applied by your hand. The surface must be completely flat and polished to at least 1000 grit. Next item needed, instant AC glue. Merely glue the iron with a very small amount of the glue. When it has set get to flattening the iron.
    Now to remove the iron from the support block. This is actually easy do to the glue having a very poor shear sheer resistance. Simply use a stout screwdriver and a hammer. Tap the on one of the long edges of the iron and it will shear off. I came across this on a YouTube video on custom clock building.😛

  2. #2
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    It is amazing how many ways have been devised to make a process more complicated than need be.

    By the time someone could completely flatten and polish a proper piece of metal to at least 1000 grit, a simpler set up could likely take care of the backs of two or three blades. It would be nice to have the backs of our blades flat to 0.0001", but it isn't necessary. What is necessary is for it to be flat enough to mate with a chip breaker to avoid shavings to get caught between the two.

    For a really bad blade, using a piece of wood with a bolt to attach it to the blade is usually good enough. If one wants to be fancy, attach a knob.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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    Have you considered new plane irons? Google "Hock".

  4. #4
    I'll file the OP as a solution in search of a problem. I'm with JK, above.

    Are we being trolled here?

    Perhaps that's harsh for a newbie who may not know better. Let me suggest he run a search in the Neanderthal sub-forum for "sharpening" and see what he can learn.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    Have you considered new plane irons? Google "Hock".
    Yup! Steep investment, but I think it may be better than trying to fix a bad blade.
    Also agree with JK that getting plane irons super flat is not really necessary. Although a Hock blade may come near to being super flat.

  6. #6
    Welcome to the Creek Andy. Thanks for posting your idea!
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

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    Although a Hock blade may come near to being super flat.
    If one wants a super flat back on a new blade, get a Veritas blade from Lee Valley. The blade will not look super polished, but it will be flatter before one tries to flatten it than it will be after.

    In my experience, Hock blades come with a uniform pattern of grinder scratches on their backs. Polishing the backs to my liking took time. It may not have really been necessary on blades not used in smoothers. If one is apt to use the ruler trick it would likely go a lot quicker.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
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    Warning: rant

    When I read threads like this, and recommendations such as 'you'll need a smoother, a block plane, a jointer, a scrub, a low angle jack, and the list goes on', then I wonder how our forebearers managed to make anything at all with their one or two wooden planes and their crooked blades and coarse sharpening stones without sharpening jigs.

    OK on a moulding plane, a plough plane and others but all those for flattening?

    I remember straightening spars with a #4 and flattening panels with the same #4 and a couple of straight sticks. A lot can be done with a #4 if the blade and the chipbreaker is set properly rather than all this bevel up this and bevel up that with a zillion different blades with different angles and jigs required to get those angles and secondary bevels..... And then oops, the sole of the plane or the iron is not flat within one thousands of an inch....

    Is this hobby about doing some woodworking or is it about collecting, and fiddling tools?

    OK rant over, I am going to hide now.
    Last edited by Marinus Loewensteijn; 09-18-2019 at 6:36 PM.

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    I have three Bedrock planes with Hock Irons and breakers. They perform flawlessly.
    Sometimes it pays to check the sole of the plane as well.

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    No..
    Stanley #3 rehab, Ash shavings.JPGStanley #3 rehab, and a #3c.JPG
    OEM irons...
    Stanley #3 rehab, messy parts.JPG
    Iron from the Stanley #3, Type 11.....
    Stanley #3 rehab, chipbreaker set back.JPG
    Back flattened( took 5 minutes) Iron honed to 2500 grit
    Stanley #3 rehab, sharpening tools.JPG
    Then stropped. Chipbreaker was mated to the flat back, no gaps, hump was polished up on the strop.
    Sole merely needed cleaned....was as flat as the day Stanley sold it. ( I quit using feeler gauges, when cars no longer had "points" to set)
    Stanley #3 rehab, stone work.JPG
    Does NOT take all that long to do.
    Then put the plane to work..
    Poplar Box Project, end grain plane.JPG
    Even if it is just end grain...hardest part, was getting my hands cleaned up. IF you can't stand getting your hands dirty....this isn't the job for you. Soap is cheaper than a new iron, BTW...
    Stanley #3 rehab, good side.JPG
    However...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinus Loewensteijn View Post
    Warning: rant

    When I read threads like this, and recommendations such as 'you'll need a smoother, a block plane, a jointer, a scrub, a low angle jack, and the list goes on', then I wonder how our forebearers managed to make anything at all with their one or two wooden planes and their crooked blades and coarse sharpening stones without sharpening jigs.

    [edited]

    I remember straightening spars with a #4 and flattening panels with the same #4 and a couple of straight sticks. A lot can be done with a #4 if the blade and the chipbreaker is set properly



    OK rant over, I am going to hide now.
    No need to hide. Much of this depends on each individuals desires, likely more than need. My start in hand planes was with a #4, #5 and a #7. Paul Sellers talks about how people can bet by with just a #4.

    For many years a scrub plane didn't seem necessary for my work. Then more and more of my lumber was bought without being surfaced at the mill. Now there are three dedicated scrub planes in my shop and another with a spare blade that could put it into scrub service very quickly.

    Just recently someone had a block plane for sale. It wasn't really needed in my shop, but it is a nice addition. Almost every woodworker will find a low angle block plane useful at one time or another.

    As for all of the other planes in my shop, there are times when a job a #4 can do, but it can be done a little better or quicker with a #3 or a #4-1/2.

    My #1 is not used a lot, but when it is, it is the one that feels right for the job. It is like a standard angle block plane with handles and a chip breaker.

    Many people do fine work with only a few planes. People who have more planes do not necessarily produce better work.

    There are also folks who enjoy hunting for and rehabilitating old planes. If one does it regularly it can provide a little extra income.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #12
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    Also..the wood doesn't care how much the plane costs. Nor does it care about who made the plane. All it sees is a sharp edge coming it's way.

    So,it isn't about what the plane is, made by, costs.....it is HOW you use the plane....that counts....UBER hasn't found a way to self-drive a hand plane. it is up to the plane's operator to figure out HOW to use the plane. All the wood sees is that sharp edge...

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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Also..the wood doesn't care how much the plane costs. Nor does it care about who made the plane. All it sees is a sharp edge coming it's way.

    So,it isn't about what the plane is, made by, costs.....it is HOW you use the plane....that counts....UBER hasn't found a way to self-drive a hand plane. it is up to the plane's operator to figure out HOW to use the plane. All the wood sees is that sharp edge...
    There are a few planes with stamped frogs or insufficient ways to secure the blade which have passed my way that might give you second thoughts on your statement above.

    Even a few Stanley/Bailey planes have come my way looking like they were made on a bad day at the factory.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
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    Even a Par Plus plane can be made into a user..BTDT...
    IMAG0190.jpg
    no.5...
    IMAG0083.jpgIMAG0086.jpg
    And, it's "frog".....again, the wood only cares about the sharp edge, not what is carrying the cutter...
    IMAG0024.jpg
    A Stanley Victor #4 ( about the same as a Handyman, just different model number)
    IMAG0018.jpg
    Can be made to do fine shavings, in Walnut.

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