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Thread: 220 drop cord

  1. #1
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    220 drop cord

    I just purchased a grizzly go833p table saw which is 220,,,i have 220 but the cord from the table saw is short and I was thinking about making a 10 foot extension cord for it,,,would this be acceptable for the saw,,im sure 12/3 would be the correct size for the wire,,,its not pulling but about 8 amps,,,my question is would it be a loss of power for the saw,,,

  2. #2
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    If you use cord as big or bigger than on the saw, there will be no noticeable loss.

  3. #3
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    12/3 SOOW cord would be just fine. It's just an extension cord.
    No, you won't see any performance degradation with just 10' of extension.
    You may want to consider just buying 15'-20' and go straight to the saw itself, if you're comfortable with doing that.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  4. #4
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    8 amps #14 is fine. It may be cheaper to replace the entire cord with one longer one. I doubt the existing male end can be reused? If not you will have to buy two cord ends to make a extension cord. You only need to buy one male end to make a longer cord. I bet one extra cord end costs more then five feet of cord.
    Bill D.
    Actually #16 wire is good for ten amps. But I do not think you can buy #16 in a quality rough service cord.

  5. #5
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    There will be no problem with what you propose, whether or not you make up an extension cord, or turn the existing cord into a short pigtail and then make up a longer "extension" that's optimal size for the run. That's how I handled all my larger machinery. Pay attention to the type of connectors you use to insure that they do not come loose. Despite the higher cost, I personally prefer using twist locks for this kind of application.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    All of my movable tools have been set up, like Jim was talking about, for over 40 years, with no problems. I'd make the cord from some type of SO 12/3 wire, in case you need it for something else later. There are many types of SO wire, for different uses, with SOOW being a most common one, and is fine. I've had nothing but good luck with Hubbell devices for the ends. You can buy SO wire, and Hubbell ends from a dedicated electrical supplier for significantly less than in the box stores, or online, if you live in a state that allows people off the street to purchase from such stores.

  7. #7
    That would work fine, just don't put a drop wire close to the saw. You go to turn around a long board and it will get hung on the drop.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    12/3 SOOW cord would be just fine. It's just an extension cord.
    No, you won't see any performance degradation with just 10' of extension.
    You may want to consider just buying 15'-20' and go straight to the saw itself, if you're comfortable with doing that.
    That's probably what I would do, I doubt that saw would be moved like a job site saw where it might need different length cords. The fewer connectors the better IME.

  9. #9
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    Last edited by lowell holmes; 09-17-2019 at 2:19 PM.

  10. #10
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    I have been using these 220v extension cords in my shop for the table saw and jointer/planner:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07K2QHXT9..._K7pGDbSKVC6QC

    They are 12 AWG copper and rated for 20 AMP, 250 Volts.

    Work fine.

  11. #11
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    No electrician here, but for my bigger draw items I always use a cord with at least the same size wire as in the wall plug.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  12. #12
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    Dec 2006
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    Toronto Ontario
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    Hi Jeff, 14/3 flexible cord has a current rating of 18 amperes, far in excess of the 8 amperes full load of your saw.

    That's what I would use as an extension cord, or to replace the original cord with a longer one.................Regards, Rod.

  13. #13
    Better to replace the too-short original cord with a longer one and eliminate the extra connectors.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  14. #14
    I used 12/3 to replace my cord in my G0833P back in December. Have had no issues with it since.

  15. #15
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    I'm using a ready made 12 ga 240 volt extension cord designed for air conditioners, etc. on my 3 hp Unisaw. It's been in place for about 14 years now, and no problems. I bought it from Lowes. The plug looks like the style used for standard 120 volt use, but the two power pins are turned 90 deg. Another version has one pin turned 90 degrees and the other is vertical. The Ground pins are the same as for 120 volts. My extension cord came from Lowes. If you can use one of these, it will be much cheaper than buying the cord, plug, and receptacle, and building it yourself.

    Charley

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