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Thread: Pole barn roofing and ventilation

  1. #1

    Pole barn roofing and ventilation

    I have an existing pole building with original roof from approx 1992. It has 4' on center trusses and is 24x32 with 8'2" floor to trusses. It needs a new roof and i'm thinking next spring is the time. I plan to insulate the pole barn and add an open air carport to the side at the same time, but i'm not sure what do do about roof ventilation. Existing roof has a 2 foot soffet in the front and that's it. there's no rear soffet, no gable vents, and no roof vents. With the addition of the carport, adding gable vents i would assume are out of the equation. is adding a ridge cap roof vent my best answer? what do i do about the back side of the pole barn where there's no soffet? what are my options here? I'd appreciate any input.

  2. #2
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    I would think that a ridge vent installed while you are re-roofing might be the easiest way to get an effective solution in place.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    A lot of the ridge vent systems I've looked at closely look like mostly wishful thinking, to me. I've built my own for standing seam roofing, but have a metal supplier that is very reasonable, and will make shapes to my design.

  4. #4
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    Climate in your country?

  5. #5
    3" of closed cell spray foam and be done with it.

  6. #6
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    Watch some RR Buildings YouTube videos for ideas.
    Not affiliated. No interests held.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugene Dixon View Post
    Watch some RR Buildings YouTube videos for ideas.
    Not affiliated. No interests held.
    Railroad, like snow sheds?
    Bill D

    https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/05/s...donner-summit/

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Rural Renovators

  9. #9
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    Sorry. been on the road for step granddaughter's 21st b-day. You should be able to go onto YouTube and enter RR Buildings into the search window. It is Rural Renovators as Tom indicated.

  10. #10
    A continuous roof vent is standard. There are different styles available. I would sister extensions on the rear trusses to form an eave and install soffits.

    You can still install a gable vent but it will be of limited effect unless you want to employ an exhaust fan.

    Spray foam is nice, but expensive. Much more advantageous if you have an open ceiling and rafters. If you have an existing under the trusses, I would go with ceiling batts or blown in.fiberglass insulation.

    It is important to a barrier strip along the bottom edge between the purlin and metal. Also along top of metal under ridge cap to keep rain out. Molded self adhesive strips are available for both applications.

    I also recommend hardware mesh across the ridge gap prior to the tin this will keep critters out.

  11. #11
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    Robert, with 4' spacing on the trusses, the amount of additional framing required to support "normal" batt-type insulation would be substantial, making closed cell spray foam on the bottom of the roofing material a bit more attractive in overall cost plus it adds substantial structural rigidity and air infiltration prevention.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    So what i take from this, i'll look into what it would take to sister on an overhang to give me a rear soffet even just for looks, if it's in the budget great if not then no big deal. Spray foam does seem like the easiest solution and I might like this option as well to give it a more open feeling rather than an 8' ceiling, but maybe i can't leave spray foam exposed? If going the spray foam route I assume the existing soffet gets closed off? Thanks everyone!

  13. #13
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    Closed cell spray foam can be left exposed in "living space" provided it's installed properly and has the retardant added. (Ours is greenish in hue from that) Unlikely to be an issue in your kind of building regardless.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    I find spray foam pretty reasonable. In an out quick, way faster than anything else.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    I find spray foam pretty reasonable. In an out quick, way faster than anything else.
    While initial cost can be higher than other insulation methods, there are a variety of factors that make it a good choice in many situations. In residential, closed cell can mean being able to use 4" studs for walls rather than more expensive 6" studs and the extra rigidity that the foam brings to the table also benefits. R21 glas for 6" walls vs R24-ish for 4" walls with closed cell spray foam gets a lot closer in cost. And then there is the superior moisture/infiltration barrier that the foam provides. Given the OP's open trusses and spacing, it would be a no-brainer for me!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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