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Thread: Lifting a Grizzly G0442 DC

  1. #1

    Lifting a Grizzly G0442 DC

    I finally have took the leap to install permanent Dust collection after much layout planning and have spent the majority of my summer weekends building an exterior 5'x8' closet to house cyclone. While constructing the DC closet I doubled up the center rafter and bolted that together and added a giant eye bolt going through the center to attach a chain hoist so I could lift during assembly my G0442 I purchased. This all went according to plan to get the impeller housing and motor assembly lifted onto the Cyclone body and upper frame this past weekend but when I went to lift the whole thing up again to install the lower leg sections I found that I was just shy of the height I needed by about 4 inches. Grrrrrr!

    I now have to figure out an alternate way to get the upper assembly high enough to attach the legs without using the chain hoist. My first idea was to rent a material lift but so far I have struck out finding one that will fit in the available space between the supports.

    One of my alternate thoughts is to raise it up as high as I can get with the hoist and build a platform to lower it to and then manually lift it up by hand with a friend using 2x4s to slowly build up the height until I can install the legs.

    The other idea is to remove the motor and impeller after unbolting it from the housing so I have enough clearance to use the hoist for the leg assembly. This makes me nervous since I'm sure this weighs over 100 lbs and I'm worried I might damage the impeller or motor in the process.

    So I'm posting here to see if any of you have any alternate suggestions, or possibly some experience removing a G0442 motor to help me make a decision for the best course of action.

    DC_Closet.jpgG0442.jpggriz.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Eastern NC
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    151
    Add a cupola to the shed? Put the eyebolt inside the cupola.

    OBTW, dearly beloved said, "Call Cheryl. Get a new she sheer she-shed." I don't want to comment further. I'm sticking with the cupola.
    Last edited by Eugene Dixon; 09-13-2019 at 9:07 PM.

  3. #3
    When I put up my cyclone, used a Harbor Freight lift cart to raise it up. I have the smaller of the two lift carts. Think the capacity is 500 lbs.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Andrew View Post
    When I put up my cyclone, used a Harbor Freight lift cart to raise it up. I have the smaller of the two lift carts. Think the capacity is 500 lbs.
    Hmmmmm.... Interesting idea but I would have to remove the cone. That's not really feasible because it is also attached to brackets that support the rest of the structure. Maybe I can build another platform to put on top of the lift for either side of the cone to lift it by the lower support. It's worth considering and exploring. Thanks!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Southeast MI.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Dixon View Post
    One of my alternate thoughts is to raise it up as high as I can get with the hoist and build a platform to lower it to and then manually lift it up by hand with a friend using 2x4s to slowly build up the height until I can install the legs.
    That would be a good way to go, But I would use a hydraulic jack & raise each side the thickness of a 2X4 at a time. Similar to the way box cribbing is used https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_crib

    One of these mini style lever lifts may work https://www.uscargocontrol.com/SSP%2...-Spec-Info.pdf They have closer lift range (hook-to-hook) than a regular chain hoist. They are expensive to buy, But most tool rental places carry them.

    Doug

  6. #6
    Maybe you could remove a shingle, drill a hole through the roof sheathing next to your "beam", and run a cable to a nearby tree or your car and use the hoist from there. Then patch the hole, replace the shingle, and you're done.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Alberta
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    Tom I really like your setup with that room to separate the cyclone from the shop.I have the same cyclone,mine is in my shop. I lifted mine with my Bobcat and pallet forks slid on the base of the motor housing. It is a big unit and awkward to assemble. My son was about 15 at the time and he was my help. I remember thinking it would not of happened without my Bobcat. However you lift keep it secured at the top. I could measure my clearance at the shop,just thinking that there is about 8-10 inches of hose to the drum,so you may not need to go all the way up on the stand.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    When I had to hold a cast iron sink up to install the rimless trim I used a screw jack centered under the tailpipe. If the cyclone is sturdy enough I would put a piece of plywood across the bottom pipe and jack it up from there. Leave some ropes tied on as safety leads in case it tips off the jack.
    Other choice is to cut a hole in the roof directly above the motor to install a roof vent. Before installing the vent lay a 4x4 across the hole, spanning at least two joists, and tie the hoist to that for the lift.
    Bil lD

  9. #9
    Can you run a cable or rope through the eyebolt, connect the cable to the chain, and attach the hoist to the floor?

  10. #10
    Some of these ideas are pretty good but I just can't bring myself to cutting a hole in the roof. The entire room is insulated including the ceiling because it will return air to the shop through a baffled vent. Lifting from the cone itself is probably a bad idea due to the total weight of around 400 lbs. I don't want to risk crushing it.

    It did occur to me last night that we have a lift stacker in our IT department at work that is used for lifting servers into racks that might do the trick . It is rated for 880 lbs and the width is narrow enough to fit between the legs, but I will need to build a support frame since the forks are about 6 inches too short. I will just have to convince the IT folks to let me borrow it.

    Just in case the IT folks say no other ideas are welcome. So far I think the best ones here in this thread are box cribbing or a HF lift.

    988935.jpg

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    Tom I really like your setup with that room to separate the cyclone from the shop.I have the same cyclone,mine is in my shop. I lifted mine with my Bobcat and pallet forks slid on the base of the motor housing. It is a big unit and awkward to assemble. My son was about 15 at the time and he was my help. I remember thinking it would not of happened without my Bobcat. However you lift keep it secured at the top. I could measure my clearance at the shop,just thinking that there is about 8-10 inches of hose to the drum,so you may not need to go all the way up on the stand.
    Mike, My initial plan was to put the cyclone in the shop but the amount of space it would take up was just too much as well as the issue of getting the intake angled to the ceiling would likely have likely reduced the efficiency. By putting it in an external closet I'm able to get the cyclone at the perfect height for a straight shot across the center of the shop. You are so right about this thing being a beast but I think lifting it is just a logistical problem I'll eventually solve. The ceiling is tall enough overall for the whole thing and the legs need to be at full height to align with my plan for the main 8" trunk to have no bends in it.

    Workshop_1.jpgWorkshop_2.jpg
    Last edited by Tom Dixon; 09-14-2019 at 7:48 AM.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    Can you run a cable or rope through the eyebolt, connect the cable to the chain, and attach the hoist to the floor?
    That is a brilliant idea! If I can't get the lift from IT this may be the next thing to try. THANKS!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    West Lafayette, IN
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    5,272
    Agreed with cable through the eye bolt. I used a hook instead of an eye and used a come along anchored. Donít rent a big lift for this. Itís way overkill.

  14. #14
    3 friends and a couple 2x4s. It can't be that heavy.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
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    1,076
    Tom that lift crane you pictured is perfect. Not sure if you have sourced dust collection fittings yet,I used spiral pipe purchased locally and got all my fittings from Spiral manufacturing. They were excellent to deal with and had everything I needed . Nice looking shop layout.

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