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Thread: Stanley #75?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
    Posts
    74

    Stanley #75?

    So I stopped at the antique store down the road from my work and they have a little no 75 bullnose plane. I have been looking for one of these for cleaning up tenon's and rabbets. They are asking $15, but there are no markings on it and I did not see any on the blade. It is dark blue in color, so maybe a later Stanley? Irwin maybe? Anyway, it's in good shape, but is that a fair price? Is there Chinese knockoffs I should be aware of?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    19,806
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    Some folks like their #75s others do not. A #90 is a better plane, though still difficult to use with a bull nose.

    All of mine were sold without regret.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    DuBois, PA
    Posts
    1,686
    Patrick Leach described the #75 as good for scraping paint from the glass near window trim. I think he was being generous in his praise, although what I have is a MF equivalent of the Stanley 75. Maybe the Stanley has extra magic? anyhow $15.00 is cheap and the plane should be like brand new, as they typically saw little use.
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,556
    I will be blunt and say that $15 is too much for this boat anchor of a plane. I sincerely doubt that you will be able to clean up rebates and tenon cheeks/shoulders with this plane. Save your money and put it towards something else.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
    Posts
    74
    Ok , consensus seems like they aren't that useful. Thanks for the opinons! I have been using a chisel to clean the shoulders and cheeks but is there a tool better suited for the job? I have seen a router plane used but I have not found one yet. I was too slow on a box of old tools that had one in there for $10. It was rusty and looked like the blade was missing but there was other good stuff in there too.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    7,917
    The #75 is good for the tasks you just described....and, it will fit into a pocket in your apron. It is more for small tasks like from cleaning the beds for window panes to sit in....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    1
    I have been using a chisel to clean the shoulders and cheeks but is there a tool better suited for the job?
    Many folks, myself included, find a chisel to be a great tool for leaning shoulders and cheeks:

    Shoulder Paring.jpg Paring a Tenon.jpg

    A low angle on the bevel and sharp edge is important.

    Lee Valley sells blades for router planes that work on Stanley and Sargent router planes. The adjuster nut may need to be flipped.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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