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Thread: Television popped and won't turn on

  1. #16
    My money goes on a capacitor. Look for one with a bulged top. When ordering a replacement off ebay, get the next higher voltage rating (DAMHIK)

  2. #17
    Yea, that's it. We used to take the tubes out and run down to the hardware store and put them on a tube tester until we found the bad one and buy another and fix it ourselves. Rarely did we have to bother with a repair technician.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    My money goes on a capacitor. Look for one with a bulged top. When ordering a replacement off ebay, get the next higher voltage rating (DAMHIK)
    If it made a loud bang, the top will likely be more than a little bulged.

    Also consider the possibilities of what caused the cap to go. It could have been age related or it could have been the failure of another component like a diode.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Dyas View Post
    Yea, that's it. We used to take the tubes out and run down to the hardware store and put them on a tube tester until we found the bad one and buy another and fix it ourselves. Rarely did we have to bother with a repair technician.
    And if you knew which symptoms were caused by which tubes you wouldn't have to carry as many with you to test. Many of the hardware and grocery store tube testers also had brochures to help explain which tubes were the likely culprits.

    The tube numbers and letters were a coded shorthand for a tube's use. A 5U4 had a 5V filament and was full wave rectifier, a common tube used in many TV power supplies.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    And if you knew which symptoms were caused by which tubes you wouldn't have to carry as many with you to test. Many of the hardware and grocery store tube testers also had brochures to help explain which tubes were the likely culprits.

    The tube numbers and letters were a coded shorthand for a tube's use. A 5U4 had a 5V filament and was full wave rectifier, a common tube used in many TV power supplies.

    jtk
    I have a nice tube desk radio. There are a surprising number of people who love to work on these today. A friend repaired mine even though it looked like it had a lightening surge.

    One thing we forget today is when we used to turn TVs and radios on there was a delay while the tubes warmed up - might be a 15-30 seconds of silence.

    JKJ

  6. #21
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    I would replace it but keep it around to see if you can fix it. It may be easier than you think. At the worst it would be a learning experience.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I have a nice tube desk radio. There are a surprising number of people who love to work on these today. A friend repaired mine even though it looked like it had a lightening surge.

    One thing we forget today is when we used to turn TVs and radios on there was a delay while the tubes warmed up - might be a 15-30 seconds of silence.

    JKJ
    Depending on the type of radio, it likely had tubes with all the filaments in series. If one went out, they all went out. Those were easy to fix with an ohm meter if one knew which pins on the tube socket were for the filaments. Usually easy to determine by the wire stringing from socket to socket.

    Currently the time it takes our receiver and TV to go through their start up program seems longer than it took for tube sets to be ready for viewing.

    Every improvement seems to have a draw back at times.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #23
    Voltage regulators can break and pop when they do. Had one do that in the power supply of a laser engraver. We replaced it, but still no worky, something else that wasn't so apparent caused it to pop.

    Most electronic stuff these days are just Dixie Cups with circuit boards...
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  9. #24
    Just make sure it's the monitor and not the computer that's the problem.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  10. #25
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    I am still using the computer, right now as a matter of fact. I took the tv/monitor to the local electronics recycling drop off earlier today. I have too many unfinished projects to add electronics repair to the list. If I get the urge to fix something, I have an old Buffalo drill press in the queue. I'm not an expert in that type of restoration, but I can at least understand what most of the parts are for. Thanks for the advice you have offered.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    One thing we forget today is when we used to turn TVs and radios on there was a delay while the tubes warmed up - might be a 15-30 seconds of silence.
    Nowadays there's 15-30 seconds of silence while the TV "boots up".
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

  12. #27
    I think I was probably 16 at the time. There was no internet and probably the technical manuals were only available at repair shops. It's funny, for some reason my parents kept the cabinet to that TV but got rid of all the components. I've often though about putting a modern television inside that cabinet. The cabinet is in remarkable condition for having been stored in a basement for more than 40 years.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Dyas View Post
    I think I was probably 16 at the time. There was no internet and probably the technical manuals were only available at repair shops. It's funny, for some reason my parents kept the cabinet to that TV but got rid of all the components. I've often though about putting a modern television inside that cabinet. The cabinet is in remarkable condition for having been stored in a basement for more than 40 years.
    TV cabinets used to be made of quality wood back in the day. Some folks made them into terrariums.

    A TV was as much a piece of furniture as it was an entertainment device.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #29
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    Years ago my dad took the guts out of his nice wooden console, and inserted a 21" TV in the case. It looked like it came that way.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  15. #30
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    11 years is not a bad life for electronics in this age. Toss it and move on.
    NOW you tell me...

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