Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 38 of 38

Thread: Midrange Table Saw Advice

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,624
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    I wouldn't use any cast iron machine anywhere there was mist in the air.
    Too true. This is a perfect place to use an aluminum and plastic jobsite saw.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  2. #32
    I bought a SawStop PCS 1.75hp saw with the 36 inch fence about a year ago and have not tripped it yet. I like it. It is heavy. I would not want to push it in and out of my shop onto the driveway. I weighs about 500 lbs. I've had several other table saws. The immediate predecessor was a Ryobi BT3100. I made a lot of furniture on it. I built a base for it and got the extension rails so I had about 5 foot of rip capacity. But later I decided a track saw and a smaller table saw make more sense for my little shop. I do not find the 1.75 hp to be a frequent issue. The only time I've tripped the overload it was due to the kerf closing up and pinching the blade. If I had shoved a wedge in to stop that it wouldn't have happened. I've ripped oak and hard maple up to about 2.75 inches thick without difficulty. You have to use a good blade for these kind of rips. I use full kerf and thin kerf blades about equally on it. 3 hp would be nice occasionally but I can make anything I need to with my 1.75 hp saw.

    With a really good mobile base it might be possible to push a PCS around but a contractor saw seems more viable for this. Unfortunately that ends to mean a less sturdy top and at least the potential for more difficulties with accuracy. I considered the Rigid but got scared off by the reports that some change blade angle when you raise and lower the blade. Great mobility and dependable accuracy don't go easily together in table saws.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    4,316
    If I had to run a table saw over a 1" threshold on a regular basis, I would just attach boards to the sides, stick axles through them and install some 8" (?) inflatable wheels from Harbor Freight on them at a point where the saw is off the ground 1 1/2". The tires should roll right over the impediment.

    Simple 6" squares (donuts) of plywood with a 3" or so hole in the middle will keep it from moving around, yet easy to just roll off when needed. If steering is needed, I leave that up to you, I would just use a simple lever.

    This all assumes you are not height challenged .
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    27
    A custom cart is a consideration. Just put 5" wheels on a custom planer cart and that rolls over threshold nicely.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    If I had to run a table saw over a 1" threshold on a regular basis, I would just attach boards to the sides, stick axles through them and install some 8" (?) inflatable wheels from Harbor Freight on them at a point where the saw is off the ground 1 1/2". The tires should roll right over the impediment.

    Simple 6" squares (donuts) of plywood with a 3" or so hole in the middle will keep it from moving around, yet easy to just roll off when needed. If steering is needed, I leave that up to you, I would just use a simple lever.

    This all assumes you are not height challenged .

  5. #35
    How hard would it be to make a temporary ramp to get over the 1 in threshold.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,634
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    How hard would it be to make a temporary ramp to get over the 1 in threshold.
    This is worth a thought. I had a garage with a lip for a long time (think they like it that way to ensure water drains out and away, and the inside of the garage is sloped towards teh door as well). I happened to find a piece of steel bar that was milled at a relatively shallow angle, and I just put that down when wanting to roll something in/out. It definitely helped.

    At that time all of my tools were on casters, including an old school 12" jointer and a massive 24" belt sander (both of these had to be over 1000#). The jointer I could get over that lip if needed. The widbelt, no way I would try it because it was a bit top heavy. Quality heavy duty casters can move a lot of weight with ease.

    My current combo machine is pretty heavy (again likely over 1000#). It is moved around on the 5" (??) casters and a johnson bar on the front. The johnson bar setup works well and once in place the weight of the machine sits on feet not casters, so it stays.

    My recommendation is a johnson bar type setup, and a small ramp. Would be able to move it pretty easily.

    That rockler base looks pretty straightforward. Would think with a small spacer ramp, and wheels the size on the rockler, you could roll pretty much any saw in/out so are not constrained on saw type.

    (I have visited the ER due to a table saw injury, if I did not own a slider I would own a sawstop, especially if a child was going to use it - and agree teach safety)
    Last edited by Carl Beckett; Today at 5:54 AM.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    27
    It would be possible to do that but still not a trivial task getting a 350 pound cabinet saw over it. I am looking at the Rockler all terrain mobile base. Little pricey but looks to be exactly what I need and I am being drawn to the PM1000 saw.

    https://www.rockler.com/rockler-all-...-up-to-800-lbs


    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    How hard would it be to make a temporary ramp to get over the 1 in threshold.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    27
    I have a planer cart I made that is well over 100 pounds. Regular 5" casters make it a snap to get in and out. The Johnson bar is a good idea I'll keep in mind but probably try without it first.

    Not sure when I can pull the string on this purchase, life getting the way currently.

    Thanks for your input


    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    This is worth a thought. I had a garage with a lip for a long time (think they like it that way to ensure water drains out and away, and the inside of the garage is sloped towards teh door as well). I happened to find a piece of steel bar that was milled at a relatively shallow angle, and I just put that down when wanting to roll something in/out. It definitely helped.

    At that time all of my tools were on casters, including an old school 12" jointer and a massive 24" belt sander (both of these had to be over 1000#). The jointer I could get over that lip if needed. The widbelt, no way I would try it because it was a bit top heavy. Quality heavy duty casters can move a lot of weight with ease.

    My current combo machine is pretty heavy (again likely over 1000#). It is moved around on the 5" (??) casters and a johnson bar on the front. The johnson bar setup works well and once in place the weight of the machine sits on feet not casters, so it stays.

    My recommendation is a johnson bar type setup, and a small ramp. Would be able to move it pretty easily.

    That rockler base looks pretty straightforward. Would think with a small spacer ramp, and wheels the size on the rockler, you could roll pretty much any saw in/out so are not constrained on saw type.

    (I have visited the ER due to a table saw injury, if I did not own a slider I would own a sawstop, especially if a child was going to use it - and agree teach safety)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •