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Thread: Midrange Table Saw Advice

  1. #16
    You could probably purchase a good used cabinet saw for as much or less than a new contractor saw would cost, especially if you are looking at sawstop. You alone can only tell if you really need a sawstop. If you are accident prone or you are teaching your kids to run a saw then a sawstop is probably a good idea. Most of us that have made a career out of woodworking has had to learn how to operate a saw safely without even a guard on the saw much less a saw with an automatic brake. I've been in the business for 46 years and have only seen one accident and this guy was so accident prone he shouldn't have be working with his hands at all.

    Normally with used machinery you can tell just by looking at it whether it has had normal use or has been abused. As long as a machine has had reasonable care it will last. I've got machinery I use daily which I bought in 1972 and only the on/off switch needs to be repaired on one of them. The other is functionally like brand new.

    I don't like Delta either. I've had a lot of issues with the quality of their equipment and way they have discontinued parts for much of their machinery. I needed parts for a planer that at the time wasn't even 10 years old and the parts were unavailable. The last straw was a grinder that only lasted two weeks. I could have taken it back but the time and gas would have cost more than the grinder was worth so I replaced it with a dollar store grinder that has lasted many years.

  2. #17
    2nd on checking out c list or next tech classifieds for a table saw. Guess facebook has buy and sell sites in your area. If you follow the safety rules, you do not get your hands close enough to cut yourself with a table saw. I keep a push stick on my fence to be able to reach it at any time. Helps if you have had training on woodworking while in school. A cabinet saw is generally a higher quality machine than a contractors saw, and if you do not have to drag it to your job works great in a shop situation. I used to use a job site saw on the job, and have another saw in my home shop. That is, after I got too old and weak to drag a contractors saw around from job to job.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    33
    Oh, good to know. I usually move my saw out to the driveway so mist/light rain is possible. Might be a "show stopper".

    Thanks Jerome

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Stanek View Post
    I would not use a Sawstop on job sites that are open air as a little mist could trigger the brake. I have cut when there is just a lite rain falling

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    33
    Perhaps wrongly I have excluded cabinet saws due to their extra weight with my need to move saw over the 1" threshold to use it. I don't feel I need a Sawstop for safety as I work pretty safe but having that feature would sure help my conscience when my son used the saw. Everything I have read about so far about Sawstop was it is a great saw even without it's famous feature. Don't mind paying a little extra for quality especially in a durable equipment.

    Accidental activations would get pretty costly with $80 cartridge and $50 or more blade

    Thanks for your helpful reply

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Dyas View Post
    You could probably purchase a good used cabinet saw for as much or less than a new contractor saw would cost, especially if you are looking at sawstop. You alone can only tell if you really need a sawstop. If you are accident prone or you are teaching your kids to run a saw then a sawstop is probably a good idea. Most of us that have made a career out of woodworking has had to learn how to operate a saw safely without even a guard on the saw much less a saw with an automatic brake. I've been in the business for 46 years and have only seen one accident and this guy was so accident prone he shouldn't have be working with his hands at all.

    Normally with used machinery you can tell just by looking at it whether it has had normal use or has been abused. As long as a machine has had reasonable care it will last. I've got machinery I use daily which I bought in 1972 and only the on/off switch needs to be repaired on one of them. The other is functionally like brand new.

    I don't like Delta either. I've had a lot of issues with the quality of their equipment and way they have discontinued parts for much of their machinery. I needed parts for a planer that at the time wasn't even 10 years old and the parts were unavailable. The last straw was a grinder that only lasted two weeks. I could have taken it back but the time and gas would have cost more than the grinder was worth so I replaced it with a dollar store grinder that has lasted many years.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    33
    CL is a possibility and I did do a quick search and as usual posts lacked info I need, poor photos and my requirements are a little constraining. I haven't tried FB yet

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Andrew View Post
    2nd on checking out c list or next tech classifieds for a table saw. Guess facebook has buy and sell sites in your area. If you follow the safety rules, you do not get your hands close enough to cut yourself with a table saw. I keep a push stick on my fence to be able to reach it at any time. Helps if you have had training on woodworking while in school. A cabinet saw is generally a higher quality machine than a contractors saw, and if you do not have to drag it to your job works great in a shop situation. I used to use a job site saw on the job, and have another saw in my home shop. That is, after I got too old and weak to drag a contractors saw around from job to job.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,354
    I read this comment and really wondered-

    "I don't feel I need a Sawstop for safety as I work pretty safe but having that feature would sure help my conscience when my son used the saw."

    if my son was using the saw, it would be a SawStop and I would be teaching him safety, safety,safety.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    San Benito, TX
    Posts
    50
    If there's any way to get 230v in your shop, do it.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    bloomington il
    Posts
    102
    have you looked at a mobile base like the rockler all terrain base?
    https://www.rockler.com/rockler-all-...-up-to-800-lbs

  9. #24
    That's it in a nutshell. If anyone else is using your saw then sawstop is probably a good idea. I think if I still had employees I would probably invest in sawstop even though it's scary that they might someday discontinue the brake for that model. I've never seen a sawstop up close. I don't know if the brake could be disposed of and the saw used like any other saw so I can only speculate.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Landenberg, Pa
    Posts
    216
    With the exception of some of the really big saws (model CB, which use a clear cartridge), there is only one cartridge (blue cartridge) for 10" blades and one cartridge for 8" dado stacks for the JSS, CNS, PCS, ICS. Uniformity in parts is sort of a critical business viability thing. The cartridges aren't going anywhere.

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Dyas View Post
    That's it in a nutshell. If anyone else is using your saw then sawstop is probably a good idea. I think if I still had employees I would probably invest in sawstop even though it's scary that they might someday discontinue the brake for that model. I've never seen a sawstop up close. I don't know if the brake could be disposed of and the saw used like any other saw so I can only speculate.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by John McKissick View Post
    Accidental activations would get pretty costly with $80 cartridge and $50 or more blade
    I've had a saw stop for 5 years or so, never any trip [false or otherwise]. Everyone's work practices differ, but I usually use either the stock miter gauge or an incra sled, where you can see the cut line and if you extend over it, then it would be pretty obvious.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,290
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Stanek View Post
    I would not use a Sawstop on job sites that are open air as a little mist could trigger the brake. I have cut when there is just a lite rain falling
    I wouldn't use any cast iron machine anywhere there was mist in the air.

  13. #28
    An option if the machine might be in the mist is one of those Harvey/Deft machines with the TIN coating which is titanium nitride or something close.
    It's the gold you see on drill bits.
    They look pretty good and not too heavy with a sheet metal base, riving knife, arbor that will take dado blades if you specify it, miter slot each side of the blade.
    I think they are only 10" though.
    Maybe there are other suppliers of these machines over there, guessing they would have the TIN coating but unsure?

    Tom

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    33
    I hadn't seen that yet. Looks interesting

    Quote Originally Posted by justin sherriff View Post
    have you looked at a mobile base like the rockler all terrain base?
    https://www.rockler.com/rockler-all-...-up-to-800-lbs

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    33
    There is always a way with enough money. Not particularly practical

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bender View Post
    If there's any way to get 230v in your shop, do it.

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