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Thread: Stanley Number 2 Plane

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Stanley Number 2 Plane

    Hi folks,

    I recently came into posession of a Stanley 2, but it appears to have mill marks on the sole and cheeks. The rest of the plane is a bit ridden hard and put away wet. 20190910_214526.jpg20190910_214516.jpg20190910_214510.jpg

    I have never seen this on any other plane and wanted to get your thoughts vis a vis authenticity. Was the price too good to be true?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Freiler,
    Are the lever cap, blade, and chip breaker in good shape? I have a #2 which is in bad shape like yours, but it has a good tote and knob. The lever cap and blade works are totally eaten up by rust. The frog is salvageable. The body is pitted and has rust. I tried to fix it, but ran into the problem of having to buy parts. Depending on where you live in NC, and if we can get together. Maybe you could have a fairly good plane. No cost to you. I live in the upstate of SC.

    Type 11 what I have.
    Last edited by Joe Tilson; 09-11-2019 at 9:09 AM. Reason: spelling
    You never get the answer if you don't ask the question.

    Joe

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Thank you for the offer Joe! Sent a PM.

  4. #4
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    The images do not have a view showing the thickness of the sole.

    The nose and the knob also look a bit odd.

    Was the price too good to be true?
    That depends on the price.

    The cost of parts for planes is relative to the cost of the plane from which the parts are found. Often it is less expensive to purchase a dog of a plane to acquire parts than it is to purchase useable parts to complete a plane.

    Hopefully you and Joe can get together to make a decent plane out of all the parts between the two of you. (hint: post some pictures when all is said and done)

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
    Pictures are a bit difficult to go by, but I've restored planes that look worse than this. You're not going to use a #2 a whole lot because where you'd use it a block plane will usually do as well.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Thank you for the advice Jim and Mike!

  7. #7
    Based on the mill mark pattern, I'm going to say that someone stuck it in a Bridgeport-type milling machine and ran a fly cutter across the sole and sides, probably to clean up the pitting. I've never seen a vintage plane that was fly cut by the manufacturer originally, and based on what the remaining pitting looks like, I'd guess it was recently done. It probably worked to flatten it, and with a little smoothing out, it would probably work as a user plane. Right now, it might be a little abrasive on the wood until it is used for a while or gets sanded out a bit.

    Stanley #2's are uncommon and kind of spendy, but the fly cutting probably ruins its value to a collector. but I can't say for sure, since I only acquire planes to use, not collect.

  8. #8
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    ran a fly cutter across the sole and sides
    That was my thought also, though didn't know it was done with a Bridgeport-type milling machine. It has the look of the old VW air cooled heads after they had been fly cut during rebuilding.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Location
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    Thank you Andrew, that makes sense to me. The nice thing is that I can sand the bottom and use it for it's intended purpose instead of just as a shelf sitter. At least I don't have to worry about destroying the collector value!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    That was my thought also, though didn't know it was done with a Bridgeport-type milling machine. It has the look of the old VW air cooled heads after they had been fly cut during rebuilding.
    jtk
    My guess was Bridgeport-type just because they are so much more common. It probably would be easier to do on a horizontal mill if one was available. Though neither are ideal compared to a proper grinding set up.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by freiler thompson View Post
    Thank you Andrew, that makes sense to me. The nice thing is that I can sand the bottom and use it for it's intended purpose instead of just as a shelf sitter. At least I don't have to worry about destroying the collector value!
    You probably don't need to sand out the marks completely (that would take forever and you would likely sand the plane out of flat), just enough so they aren't sharp and catch the wood. They will make good pockets to hold the wax on the sole

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