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Thread: Vintage European Band Saws

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    Vintage European Band Saws

    I was thinking about this during my lengthy commute this morning, and for all the great examples of jointers, planets, table saws, shapers, and mortisers Ive seen from the 20th century across the Atlantic, I have never seen people talk about old European band saws. In fact, I think Ive only ever seen a couple examples of Wadkin saws in the 30-36 range pre 1960. All lead me to wonder, why were Martin and the other German manufacturers not making an incredible bandsaw at the time? Comparatively, I feel like guys can barely give away the 36+ notthfields, Olivers, and tannewitz saws here in the states. The Yates seem to sell anytime I see them on the used market, but the rest usually sell for the price of a 14 Taiwan saw with a warranty.

  2. #2
    Google Bauerle bandsaws.

    I will own one of the older cast ones.

    They are all pretty rare here and for the most part, a big BS, is a big BS.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Ouray Colorado
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    I have a little 500 mm Hema from the 80s. It does not have a cast frame but is a smooth running saw with a lot of features not commonly found on bandsaws. Way better quality of build and function than my Agazzini.
    iCA01A265-BE45-4095-8BBD-6EF617DD8317.jpg

    The guide raise and lower is a chain drive with handwheel that stays true with the guides at any height.
    6625AAB5-A318-4E55-9467-C6DBB2AFCA9E.jpg

    The fence is solid cast cast iron with a drift adjustment.
    06D3E279-AA24-414D-BFFF-043C5C2221D9.jpg

    The miter gauge rides rides on a bar and folds out of the way.

    E85635D2-AE84-4AE0-A61F-F2661F1095FF.jpg

    The table tilts easily.

    3D0E02BA-D8F9-433C-98E9-E331C365F490.jpg

  4. #4
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    Joe, that’s a nice little saw. How’s the noise level on it compared to the Aggazani?

    I like my MM20 but it is much louder than I had expected and I wonder if that is typical of sheet metal saws.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #5
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    This little Frommia is the smoothest running saw I have encountered. I tried to buy it off the owner of a German shop but he would not part with it!. As Darcy mentions Baurele is a good one.
    38BF98AD-76ED-4C2A-B4DB-0D0D13010C78.jpg

    Zimmerman is probably the best band saw made and was a favorite in pattern shops. They are a little boxy looking but very functional and accurate. This is the upper wheel assembly of one in the pattern shop of a school. Sorry could not find a picture of the saw.

    9495D385-3D78-4B26-9116-8776581EF6C2.jpg

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Joe, that’s a nice little saw. How’s the noise level on it compared to the Aggazani?

    I like my MM20 but it is much louder than I had expected and I wonder if that is typical of sheet metal saws.
    It’s pretty quiet Brian. The Aggazani is loud. That Frommia though was the best in that respect.

  7. #7
    I forgot about Zimmermann, sure they are excellent machines, but the older Bauerle is the best looking.

  8. #8
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    Thanks, Joe!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    New York, NY
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    Not too many nicer bandsaws out there than the ones built by Chambon Guilliet.





    https://www.international-machines-b...e-a-ruban.html

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    There has to be thousands of classic old bandsaw machines to choose from, many of them were quite beautiful, and seriously built.
    I have had a few bandsaws over the years, Delta, General, Meber, Makita Resaw, Hitachi Resaw, and a Zimmermann, I have Only owned one classic saw, my current saw which is the 1950 30" Robinson YD/T it ticks all of the boxes for me. A 2184 lb awe inspiring work of industrial art.

    My first bandsaw;
    Not sure on the year, but i am 65 now, so it was a while back.


    013.jpg

    My Makita Resaw.

    124.jpg

    This General i sold for a friend, so i didn't use it myself.

    1-SAM_3324.jpg

    The Meber, (not my cup of tea at all)

    Meber2.JPG Meber1.JPG

  11. #11
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  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    Those are really big!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  14. #14
    Panhans make some quality machines and are still going strong.

    What is so loud about your MM20 Brian?
    My 24" ACM star running from a VFD is relatively quiet.
    I had a 20" single phase machine with an electric brake before, and it gave quite a harsh noise starting and stopping.
    Is this what you are referring to?

    Just got some new Axminster blades for what was my troublesome saw
    I never got around to replacing the lower tire what was damaged previously, and dressed it to what looked good to my eyes.
    Still I had problems on the multiple blades I had bought from a previous supplier, they were walking around, never stayed put and led to much rubbing of the thrust guide.
    There was a cranky creaking sound when hand turning the wheels, or when the machine was coasting to a stop.
    These issues are all gone with these blades, its good to know that I can get a blade from a company that has invested heavily in the manufacturing equipment
    so will be back again when the time comes.
    I can't wait to try cutting some thicker stock with these when the time comes.

    Tom

  15. #15
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    That doesn’t surprise me, 3ph motors run more quietly.

    No weird noise, just generally a bit loud. Sheet metal machines transmit more vibration from the motor than cast iron.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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