Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Sliding table saw?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,694

    Sliding table saw?

    Hadnt seen anything like this before.

    https://nh.craigslist.org/tls/d/wolf...959409347.html

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,073
    Carl that is something I have never seen before either. Sure makes cast iron ugly. Maybe that is one of Matthias Wandel's ancestors saws.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    772
    Why don't you pick that up and let us know how it works out.

  4. #4
    Seems like it was an old belt driven machine.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    1,073
    That is one of the coolest looking machines that I have seen. So much more inviting than a green or grey chunk of cast iron and steel. Would be real interesting to know the history of it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,849
    How funny to read your guys' perception. I happen to think a nice shiny cast iron top is far more sleek and beautiful looking! The thought of wood on wood contact and the grinding nature a sliding mechanism would cause makes be cringe! Guess Im just a different breed.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,416
    Pretty cool looking. Someone definitely had a need they couldn't afford at the time it was built.
    I like the attention to detail, ingenuity, and craftsmanship of the project.
    It would be interesting to see how "accurate" it is. I bet at one time, it was pretty darn functional, maybe still is.
    It's worth the $$$$ just to use as an assembly, or out feed table. You won't build something like that for $200.00 today.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rivel View Post
    How funny to read your guys' perception. I happen to think a nice shiny cast iron top is far more sleek and beautiful looking! The thought of wood on wood contact and the grinding nature a sliding mechanism would cause makes be cringe! Guess Im just a different breed.
    The rolling part has iron parts.

    Woodworking machinery started out as wood framed machines with a few iron parts back in the day. Made beautiful stuff with those things.

    It could very well be a manufactured machine, not home built.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,272
    Besides being terribly ugly (to my eyes), I can only imagine that it's a pretty bad saw to try to keep in tune.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,992
    Wonder how the motor is supposed to be mounted?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Besides being terribly ugly (to my eyes), I can only imagine that it's a pretty bad saw to try to keep in tune.
    I think its beautiful, it very well looks like 1880s components and joinery. Square head bolts, Babbitt bearings, the arbor assembly and sliding table assembly cast parts look very nice. I doubt that saw was really any trouble to keep tuned up.

    Wood frame machines with iron parts started in the 1850s or so and Beach was still making wood framed sliding cut off saws well into the 20s probably even longer.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Wonder how the motor is supposed to be mounted?
    Now to the floor, then, line shaft under the floor.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    I think its beautiful, it very well looks like 1880s components and joinery. Square head bolts, Babbitt bearings, the arbor assembly and sliding table assembly cast parts look very nice. I doubt that saw was really any trouble to keep tuned up.

    Wood frame machines with iron parts started in the 1850s or so and Beach was still making wood framed sliding cut off saws well into the 20s probably even longer.
    Darcy, your comment made me go back & have a better look. At first glance, I just saw something neo-rustic with a bad stain job, got turned off & looked no further. My bad.

    I now agree that it is a fine looking piece of machinery. I still think it would be a struggle to keep it finely adjusted though.

  14. #14
    Lol, I wonder if it's homemade.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Dyas View Post
    Lol, I wonder if it's homemade.
    It looks typical of the era, order the cast components from the company of your choice and shop build the machine.

    Hard to say who made the parts, but it could very well be made and sold by a company from that time.

    Lots of wood framed machines still out there.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •