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Thread: First time using Epoxy for glue up / assembly - some questions

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Posts
    347
    Thanks for all the knowledge and replies. All of this is very helpful.
    That's just like, your opinion, man.

  2. #17
    I would not use acetone to clean up the joint. It can wick into the wood too well, meaning you risk a stain as it carries some epoxy into the wood . Just use a putty knife or wait until it dries and chisel; sand it.

    I would clamp. The adhesive takes up Additional space in the mortise and also serves as a gasket to slow air at the bottom from escaping as the tenon is inserted. As the air compressed at the bottom of the mortise, it can push your tenon out a little. So use a clamp.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I would not use acetone to clean up the joint. It can wick into the wood too well, meaning you risk a stain as it carries some epoxy into the wood . Just use a putty knife or wait until it dries and chisel; sand it.

    I would clamp. The adhesive takes up Additional space in the mortise and also serves as a gasket to slow air at the bottom from escaping as the tenon is inserted. As the air compressed at the bottom of the mortise, it can push your tenon out a little. So use a clamp.
    I would also recommend clamping.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    New Boston, Michigan
    Posts
    74
    I use T-88 from SystemThree for long open time projects. Especially for doweling. I have had several near disasters with Titebond II when I did not drill the holes deep enough and the joint would not close. Once the fluted dowels swell up from the glue they are vary hard to remove. I like to mix the T88 with walnut sawdust to fill knot holes and flaws in a walnut board. Epoxy is sloppy and gets on everything. T88 says it is stainable. It sands off better than pva glues without blocking the stain.

    It has a higher temperature rating than Titebond so I will be using it on a commission job to make custom pine and hickory heat vents.

    Best of luck with the doors.
    Ask a woodworker to "make your bed" and he/she makes a bed.

  5. #20
    My opinion on epoxy is if you are re-gluing something that has been glued before epoxy is the right glue. It's better for non-porous applications. On new well fitted wood parts a PVA glue is the right adhesive. Then it's very difficult anymore to buy an epoxy glue that will take hours to dry. You just can't assemble a door in 5 minutes. A 5 minute epoxy would dry up before you could get the door put together. A PVA glue would give you enough open time you can assemble a door and clean up the excess glue before it sets up.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Dyas View Post
    My opinion on epoxy is if you are re-gluing something that has been glued before epoxy is the right glue. It's better for non-porous applications. On new well fitted wood parts a PVA glue is the right adhesive. Then it's very difficult anymore to buy an epoxy glue that will take hours to dry. You just can't assemble a door in 5 minutes. A 5 minute epoxy would dry up before you could get the door put together. A PVA glue would give you enough open time you can assemble a door and clean up the excess glue before it sets up.
    You're only looking at that epoxy sold in the Borg. West Systems (for example) has a slow hardener that gives you lots of open time. It takes a day to really cure, however.

    I've used that glue when PVA would not give me a long enough open time.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    2,213
    I use alcohol to clean up the mess it creates. I also use a brush to apply the glue when before it starts to thickening (almost like syrup yet) to "wet" the mating surfaces and then let the glue thicken a bit (so that it doesn't run down so easily) and apply it to the joints.
    I used it for my entry door glue-up (96"x42"x2.25") with 4 double layer panels and insulation foam between the panels. Used West system. Lots of open time. Still did mine in two stages due to complication of the glue-up.
    Last edited by mreza Salav; 09-09-2019 at 12:41 AM.

  8. #23
    It wasn't so long ago all epoxy took a long time to dry. Now you have to either order it or go to a specialty shop to get a slow set epoxy. Personally I think that slow set epoxy is stronger than the 5 minute epoxy.

    Sure you have to work fast with a PVA glue but even when it starts setting up the clamps will pull the door together. Another adhesive I've used on entry doors is a resin glue. It gives a little more open time but the dried glue isn't as water resistant as the exterior PVA glues they make today.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    ...The best advice is to not have squeeze out with epoxy.
    Actually the worst advice. If there is no squeeze-out, you have a dry joint.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas McCurnin View Post
    ...You should leave it in clamps for a day or two, though.
    Completely unnecessary.

    Note: always prime all glued surfaces with neat resin/hardener mix. End grain and plywood edge grain may take many coats.

    WEST also provides an extra slow hardener for increased pot life, particularly for hot weather.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

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