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Thread: California flowering Pear tree

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    Newport Beach, CA
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    California flowering Pear tree

    I recently had a flowering Pear tree cut down in my back yard in Southern California. I have multiple logs from this tree. I have attached a picture of the wood pile. The log are from 3" to 10" in diameter, and 12" to 18' IN Length.

    I understand this wood is useful for making things, and for carving. I would hate to have this wood end up as firewood if it is desireable for other uses.

    Can anyone advise me on where I can find people/companies that would be interested in buying some or all of this wood.

    Thank you

    Luke Dru
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    It was popular in 18th century for picture frames and treenware. I think you will do better selling it here. I've never seen
    it used in any factory made items.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    In my neighborhood, we have a lot of decorative pear around, and after a storm, I drive around looking for downed trees and limbs. Finding one straight and wide enough to be usable is rare. Can you find a local woodturning club and see if they'd be interested? The logs look too short to cut into usable flat lumber. Unless you seal the ends of these logs, they'll start checking really quickly (like maybe already) and lessen their value. I wouldn't mess with the ones less than 5" diameter or so. IME pear can be great wood for making small objects, but like other fruitwoods, can split, twist and cup a lot when drying.

    If you say your exact location, there might be someone near you interested.

    You can also use the smaller pieces for smoking meat if so inclined.
    Last edited by Stan Calow; 09-07-2019 at 8:45 AM.

  4. #4
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    If you say your exact location, there might be someone near you interested.
    Hi Luke, if you enter your home city into your profile it helps when looking for a local solution.

    Spoon carving is often done with green wood. The pieces have been cut too short for things like chair making. Unless you wanted to make small furniture.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
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    Sep 2019
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    Newport Beach, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    It was popular in 18th century for picture frames and treenware. I think you will do better selling it here. I've never seen
    it used in any factory made items.
    Thanks for the reply. I live in Newport Beach CA. I've read that it is also popular for carving. Of corse I found out all of that after the guy cut it down. I would have had him make it in longer pieces.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2019
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    Newport Beach, CA
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    Stan
    Thanks for the info and ideas. I live in Newport Beach, CA. Right, too short for usable lumber. Carving and making small items seem to be the likely uses. If i had know, I would have had the guy that cut it down make the logs longer, oh well. WHat is the best way to seal the ends, it was cut down 4 days ago.

  7. #7
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    Sep 2019
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    Newport Beach, CA
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    Jim

    Thanks for the reply. I live in Newport Beach, CA. I will see about adding that to my profile

  8. #8
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    Sep 2019
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    Newport Beach, CA
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    Mel
    I was thinking of companies that provide supplies to hobbyists and/or carvers.

  9. #9
    As Dragline said: Why not! But we have guys here who turn pens and other small stuff. It's easy to sell when items are
    not fragile and not sold by hordes of dealers. A contribution of $6 dollars a year gives you access to lots of potential
    buyers.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke Dru View Post
    Mel
    I was thinking of companies that provide supplies to hobbyists and/or carvers.
    Unfortunately, it's very, very unlikely that any commercial operation will be interested in the wood. Your best bet is local turners and carvers and even then, this stuff tends to get given away rather than sold.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Kansas City
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    Luke there are products used to seal the ends - one is Anchorseal. But you can also use things you might have around - latex paint or heavy wax. I've used axle grease before. Nothing works perfectly or for a long time, but keep them out of the sun. Sometimes they start splitting right away, so best do triage on what you have now. The larger ones, even if they start checking, can still be salvageable for woodturners.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Is this Bradford pear?

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