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Thread: marshmallows - old time vs modern

  1. #1
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    marshmallows - old time vs modern

    To me, modern marshmallows are inferior to the mashmallows I remember from childhood (1950's). Has the recipe changed? - or is it just a decline in my taste buds?

    The decline began when the packages began to say "non dairy", but I'm not sure that mashmallows ever had dairy products in them. The "non-dairy" advertising might have been a fad, similar to the "gluten free" advertising that appears on products that never had a gluten version to begin with.

    Are modern marshmallows made with egg whites? Were old time marshmallows made with sugar? - or with corn syrup?

    I especially notice the inferior taste of modern marshmallows when they are roasted. Another disappointment is the way "rice krispies treats" candy turns out when made with modern marshmallows.

  2. #2
    Stephen, I like the rice crispy things ,too. They don't seem different now. My guess is that taste buds get more precise
    with age ....then deteriorate. I suggest you make some egg nog. There are many recipes, find one you really like and I
    think you will no longer miss the old time marshmallows.

  3. #3
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    My wife has made marshmellows using the recipe Alton Brown published. They taste a lot different than what you get in the store. No dairy in that recipe.

  4. #4
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    I suggest you make some egg nog. There are many recipes, find one you really like and I
    think you will no longer miss the old time marshmallows.
    Friends and family have told me this is the best egg nog they have ever had:

    EGG NOG
    Ingredients:

    4-Cups whole milk (scalded)
    10-eggs separated (any yolk in the whites and they will not whip properly)
    3/4-Cups sugar (1/2 cup and then 1/4 cup.
    1/2-tsp salt
    1-Cup heavy cream (whipped)
    Vanilla to taste
    Nutmeg
    Optional: Rum or Brandy

    Procedure:

    Scald the milk, be careful not to burn. This is done by heating the milk to a point just below a boil. It must be stirred constantly, when it starts to form a layer of bubbles, and the surface looks satin like, remove from heat and set aside.

    In the top of the double boiler combine 1/2-Cup of sugar with egg yolks. Set the heat to below a boil. Slowly stir in the scalded milk. Stir constantly making sure to drag the spoon across the bottom (a wooden spoon with an end flattened at an angle works great), until the mixture thickens enough to coat the spoon lightly. It is better to do this with the heat too low than too high. This can take a lot of patience. Remove from heat and chill thoroughly, in the refridgerator over night is good.

    When the yolk mixture is chilled, add salt (1/2 tsp.) to the whites and beat until thick, gradualy mix in the sugar (remaining 1/4 Cup). The thickness of the whites is what determines the texture of the finished drink. It can vary from a delicate smooth texture to thick froth. This is a time when having two mixers is very handy. It is best to use a ladle to transfer the whites into the yolks. this helps to make sure all the whites get whipped. As the whites are being poured into the yolks, fold the mixture. If using an electric mixer use on the lowest setting. If further whipping of the whites is needed be sure to wash the beaters if they have been in contact with the yolks.

    Whip the cream to a consistancy to match the egg whites. Blend in to the mixture. The mixture can be chilled in a freezer for an hour, and then set in a refridgerator until serving time. When serving take care to remix as the ingriedients will seperate. this is done easily with a ladle picking up some of the beverage and pouring it back into the mixture and repeating until it is of an even texture. This evening at our Thanksgiving dinner one of the Grandmothers that only speaks Finnish got very excited after tasting the Eggnog. I have no idea what she said, but I was told she enjoyed it very much.

    Add a little brandy and you won't be worrying about marshmallows.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
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    Have you tried different brands? We toast two bags of marshmallows each winter in our fireplace. Campfire brand is our choice when we can find them, otherwise it is Kraft Jet Puffed. I just found this write up on marshmallows: https://www.epicurious.com/ingredien...-store-article

    Toasting them over a fire is a bit of an art. I have become quite proficient at toasting that perfect marshmallow if the fire is right. You don't cook over the flames, you need hot coals. Best if cooked by holding the marshmallow off to the side so you get only radiant heat from the red hot coals, not the heat rising from the fire. Turn them a few seconds after they begin to smoke.
    Last edited by Ole Anderson; 09-06-2019 at 9:48 AM.
    NOW you tell me...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    Have you tried different brands? We toast two bags of marshmallows each winter in our fireplace. Campfire brand is our choice when we can find them, otherwise it is Kraft Jet Puffed. I just found this write up on marshmallows: https://www.epicurious.com/ingredien...-store-article

    Toasting them over a fire is a bit of an art. I have become quite proficient at toasting that perfect marshmallow if the fire is right. You don't cook over the flames, you need hot coals. Best if cooked by holding the marshmallow off to the side so you get only radiant heat from the red hot coals, not the heat rising from the fire. Turn them a few seconds after they begin to smoke.
    All my kids prefer them to be literally on fire first, then blown out and consumed. Best way in the mind of the consumer.

  7. #7
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    For a real treat, one could make their own 'natural' marshmallows:

    https://www.newlifeonahomestead.com/...t-root-recipe/

    You may even be able to grow marsh mallow in your back yard.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
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    sugar, corn syrup, gelatin, egg whites if you prefer the French style. Pretty easy to make and add flavors as you like. No dairy. At the end of the day you still have marshmallows, so I don't bother.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Barry View Post
    All my kids prefer them to be literally on fire first, then blown out and consumed. Best way in the mind of the consumer.
    I never liked whole gooey marshmallows, I always did the 'layered' on-fire method; catch on fire for about 2 seconds, blow it out, wait a few seconds for it to cool, pull off the burnt ring and eat it. Repeat until gone. Done right, the rings were crispy with very little burn and just enough goo, and the remaining marshmallow never got soft enough to ooze off the stick
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  10. Apparently the marshmallow as an old world herb has gotten out and naturalized in some mid atlantic coastal areas. They grow in coastal Delaware and I remember a lady in the early 1970's made some marshmallow candy from the roots she harvested. Whether it was the real herb marsh mallow or just a common mallow that grew in the marsh, I do not know. She also tapped trees for syrup in late winter. First time I ever had syrup from black walnut tree sap.

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