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Thread: Sliding Table Saw Jigs ?

  1. #1
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    Question Sliding Table Saw Jigs ?

    Iím new to my Felder KF500 and am just now starting to learn working with a slider versus my prior PM66 cabinet saw. other than a fritz and franz jig, and a deflector wedge, are there other jigs for doing things like finger/box joints? Iíve searched and didnít find much but figured there must be a way to do this similar to the various jigs for cabinet saws (think Incra I-box).

    I do realize you can do some things with the built in shaper, but tooling costs so much that it will take me years to build up my collection of shaper tooling beyond my Whitehill combi block and my Felder groover.

    Thanks for any pointers or leads to jig plans or idea websites.

  2. #2
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    Greg, you could purchase this from Felder ...



    I built my own version ...







    I added a Wixey DRO for the fence to my K3 ..



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  3. #3
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    Nice. That’s Derek. What is the benefit to that angle jig over just using the original miter cross cut fence?

    also what wixey unit did you use? That looks handy.

    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Note for the wixey or any other dro with an encoder track, you wonít be able to rotate the fence out of the way when needed. If you want to be able to rotate the fence you will need to use a dro with a magnetic encoder like a Fiama.

    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    Nice. Thatís Derek. What is the benefit to that angle jig over just using the original miter cross cut fence?

    also what wixey unit did you use? That looks handy.

    Thanks.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Parrish View Post
    Nice. That’s Derek. What is the benefit to that angle jig over just using the original miter cross cut fence?

    also what wixey unit did you use? That looks handy.

    Thanks.
    Greg, if you are cutting mitres, such as picture frames or any mitred joint that must be 90 degrees, the advantage of the mitre- over the crosscut fence is that it will always provide a combined 90 degree angle: you saw one side, and then the complementary adjoining side. The crosscut fence can be set for 45 degrees on one side only.

    With regard the Wixey DRO, it attached to the fence lock with a magnet. It is therefore easy to lock and unlock. Since the DRO has a zero set ability, you can set up in seconds the high and low fence. No drama, and really useful when needing to move the fence in fractions of a mm.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Last edited by Derek Cohen; 09-05-2019 at 8:21 AM.

  6. #6
    Also, adjusting the crosscut fence on most sliders is a bear.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Also, adjusting the crosscut fence on most sliders is a bear.
    I have no issue with my CF741.

    Greg, you can make a jig to cut box joints. I drilled two bolt holes in a length of plywood for ľ inch bolts at the height of the void on the crosscut extrusion -- get a length of bolt that will not extend past the face of the plywood. You will need to drill a recess to accept the nuts. Slide it into the extrusion. You can then cut a registration for a pin for a box joint jig. Works great.

    I use a similar technique to fasten a piece of sacrificial scrap plywood to serve as a backer when cutting tenons on the shaper as well.

    I've also made a square box to hold pieces vertically when I needed to rip miters that were at odd angles. You can move the crosscut fence extrusion over near the blade, or the shaper spindle, to provide a bit more support -- just be sure to check clearance (mine has now enriched with new features in it's shape...).

    Mike

  8. #8
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    I have a lot of shop made and purchased accessories for our slider, some get used a lot and others not so much but nice when you need them. The double miter is one of my favorites even though our saw has a very accurate cross mitering fence. The double miter is quick to set and great for small pieces. Holzwerken has some videos for a shop built version.
    i work mostly solid wood.

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  9. #9
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    Thanks for this thread and sharing all the ideas.

    Specific to the incra i-box jig, I modified a piece scrap so that the jig could be used directly on the slider - you just need a miter slot to register it. Also I modified an incra miter guide so it would fit the groove on the slider and use that as well (prefer the incra to adjusting the rather long crosscut guide that is on the outrigger).

    Conceptually, I think most 'regular' fixtures and jigs can be modified to be used on the slider. Sometimes it is just a matter of removing the miter bar and instead clamping it to the sliding table, or onto an interim piece. And often there are other ways of doing things would be better, it is a different tool than the regular cabinet saw.
    Last edited by Carl Beckett; 09-06-2019 at 10:22 AM.

  10. #10
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    Carl, can you post pictures of your I-box jig setup when you have time? Thanks. Greg

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    Thanks for this thread and sharing all the ideas.

    Specific to the incra i-box jig, I modified a piece scrap so that the jig could be used directly on the slider - you just need a miter slot to register it. Also I modified an incra miter guide so it would fit the groove on the slider and use that as well (prefer the incra to adjusting the rather long crosscut guide that is on the outrigger).

    Conceptually, I think most 'regular' fixtures and jigs can be modified to be used on the slider. Sometimes it is just a matter of removing the miter bar and instead clamping it to the sliding table, or onto an interim piece. And often there are other ways of doing things would be better, it is a different tool than the regular cabinet saw.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    Thanks for this thread and sharing all the ideas.

    Specific to the incra i-box jig, I modified a piece scrap so that the jig could be used directly on the slider - you just need a miter slot to register it. Also I modified an incra miter guide so it would fit the groove on the slider and use that as well (prefer the incra to adjusting the rather long crosscut guide that is on the outrigger).

    Conceptually, I think most 'regular' fixtures and jigs can be modified to be used on the slider. Sometimes it is just a matter of removing the miter bar and instead clamping it to the sliding table, or onto an interim piece. And often there are other ways of doing things would be better, it is a different tool than the regular cabinet saw.
    I made an insert for the T slot so that it fits snugly in the slot by milling a piece of cherry. In the top of the insert, I milled a grove the depth and width of a miter slot. It makes it easy to mount fixtures that require a miter slot on a traditional cabinet saw.

  12. #12
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    Great idea Mike.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  13. #13
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    This is it, nothing magic. There is a spacer under the overhung part that doesnt show up, but just remove the bar and screw to a piece of baltic birch and clamp it to the table.

    My miter slot is smaller than a standard miter (MM CU300 combo), so am unable to use a miter slot adapter. Instead I have to mill down miter bars to fit. I did some of wood and some of metal. The incra miter was modified in this way (could do the same on the i-box jig but just as easy to remove the bar and screw it to a board...). It works.

    I have a tenoning jig I might do the same with, although have been cutting tenons in a different manner so havent done that one. But the same would be pretty easy, just remove the bar then screw it down to a board and clamp the board onto the sliding table.

    In concept, all the miter bar/slot does for you on a cabinet saw is allow motion in a straight line (aligned to the blade). The sliding table already does this, so all you need to do is clamp the jig to the table and you have the same function. you do not have to use an interim piece of wood, sometimes you can just clamp directly to the table and square it against your slider miter.

    Now that I have seen these frame/corner mitering setups, that will be a must do for me. Simple! Thanks for all the ideas!

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    Last edited by Carl Beckett; 09-06-2019 at 7:33 PM.

  14. #14
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    Carl is correct that you can theoretically use the same or similar jigs fastened to the slider's wagon that you would use with the miter slot on a cabinet saw. The caveat is that for any jig that requires a dado blade set, the slider has to be capable of either running a traditional dado set (mine is) or the equivalent in the case of Felder. Felder's dado setup is "different" and not all their machines are compatible with it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
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    Derek, not seeing how you can rotate the fence out of the way without hitting the encoder rail - what am I missing?

    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    I have no issue with my CF741.

    Greg, you can make a jig to cut box joints. I drilled two bolt holes in a length of plywood for ľ inch bolts at the height of the void on the crosscut extrusion -- get a length of bolt that will not extend past the face of the plywood. You will need to drill a recess to accept the nuts. Slide it into the extrusion. You can then cut a registration for a pin for a box joint jig. Works great.

    I use a similar technique to fasten a piece of sacrificial scrap plywood to serve as a backer when cutting tenons on the shaper as well.

    I've also made a square box to hold pieces vertically when I needed to rip miters that were at odd angles. You can move the crosscut fence extrusion over near the blade, or the shaper spindle, to provide a bit more support -- just be sure to check clearance (mine has now enriched with new features in it's shape...).

    Mike

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