Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 29

Thread: Craigslist bucket

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
    Posts
    74

    Craigslist bucket

    So there was a bucket of tools for sale on Craigslist that I picked up for $5. I was like a kid on Christmas going through this thing. There was some mechanics tools, old power drill, some gardening shears, but there was also 2 hand saws, one is a disston, a Stanley brace with a few bits, what I think is a Yankee drill, couple rasps, and what I am most excited about, what I think is an old timber framing chisel. There's no handle and the edge needs to be reground, but it looks perfectly useable with a new edge.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    Nice haul, the Yankee brace looks like the 2101 the Bell System used to use. Like wise on the Stanley/Yankee #41 push drill.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    1,350
    Yup. #2101 Brace. The best there is as far as I'm concerned. Good shape too. Too bad the slick has been mushroomed so bad. Perhaps it can be repaired?
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Yup. #2101 Brace. The best there is as far as I'm concerned. Good shape too. Too bad the slick has been mushroomed so bad. Perhaps it can be repaired?
    It is often possible to rehab a mushroomed chisel socket without resorting to welding on new material. Here is how one of mine was handled:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?245479

    This was a much smaller chisel, but the restoration would go about the same.

    The trick is finding a way to rig up something to use like an anvil.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    7,928
    Hmmm...BTDT...
    wide chisel.JPGDSCF0003.JPGrehandled.JPG
    Handle was too long, though...gave it a shorter one...and...
    Used it last month or so...
    Post work, notch clean up.JPG
    Half-lap needed flattened.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    487
    I cant read your square due to glare, but i assume its 2" wide? Looks like a good rehab, how does it perform? Even after you cleaned it up that thing looks like its been through a war. I keep waiting around for a cheap slick. Its something i wouldnt use too often, which is why i dont want to spend $100+ on one, but its also a chisel i want to have in the tool cabinet.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Kane View Post
    I cant read your square due to glare, but i assume its 2" wide? Looks like a good rehab, how does it perform? Even after you cleaned it up that thing looks like its been through a war. I keep waiting around for a cheap slick. Its something i wouldnt use too often, which is why i dont want to spend $100+ on one, but its also a chisel i want to have in the tool cabinet.
    Hi Patrick, If you use ebay, set up a search on chisels and check regularly. You can add a few qualifiers. You could even set up different searches with different qualifiers. It sometimes helps to catch the odd ball with a bigger net. Here is a picture of my 2" Stanley and a 3/8" chisel:

    Chair Spindle Socket Chisel Handles.jpg

    The handles were made for these from recycled parts of a chair. My recollection is with shipping the total was less than $25 for the 2" Stanley.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 09-04-2019 at 1:55 PM. Reason: error in including image
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    Just did a quick search and found a few good candidates on ebay searching > 2 inch chisel <.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,501
    I like the framing chisel!

    Over-all, a very nice haul.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    While looking for an old post, this post from Harry Strasil came up:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?112339

    It is an easy way to quickly gauge the taper of a chisel's socket.

    Be sure to read the last post for added instruction on its use.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    7,928
    Square is a 6"....chisel measures 1-15/16" wide....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Northeast WI
    Posts
    74
    So it was late last night when I was rummaging through everything. I looked a little closer today and both the drills are marked bell system, and it is a genuine Yankee drill number 41 (even some bits in the handle) and it is a Stanley brace. He timber framing slick has an embarrassing edge on it. I'm new to the hand tool world, but is the socket not supposed to have the flare? I have an anvil and could try pounding it out cold. I will definitely try the tapering jig. What material should I make the handle from? Is there a specific length it should be? Can I make it with hand tools or do I need a lathe? Sorry for all the questions, but thanks for all the answers!IMG_20190904_162837511.jpgIMG_20190904_162736266.jpgIMG_20190904_162856376.jpg

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,501
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Buresh View Post
    So it was late last night when I was rummaging through everything. I looked a little closer today and both the drills are marked bell system, and it is a genuine Yankee drill number 41 (even some bits in the handle) and it is a Stanley brace. He timber framing slick has an embarrassing edge on it. I'm new to the hand tool world, but is the socket not supposed to have the flare? I have an anvil and could try pounding it out cold. I will definitely try the tapering jig. What material should I make the handle from? Is there a specific length it should be? Can I make it with hand tools or do I need a lathe? Sorry for all the questions, but thanks for all the answers!
    First thing I would do would be try to remove some rust. I have not looked at the link for how to deal with the socket, but, you probably can create the handle without a lathe, but, it would be a bit more difficult. Something like trying to shave it down or cut it down. I saw a thing about making handles by cutting octagons, but then you would need to cut tapered octagons; that sounds tricky, but possible I suppose.

    If you lived closer, I would sharpen that chisel for you. You could just mail it to me, but, the cost of shipping would be greater than you paid for the chisel I think. Before you think about sharpening, decide what angle you want on that thing. Pretty sure you do not want it at say 15 degrees Might shave pine end grain but would fail for what ever it was really meant to do! A mortise chisel is usually 35 to 40 degrees I think. I do not have a good answer, but, you need to know that before you decide to sharpen. The existing edge looks like it will not be useful in see what it used to be.

    I had hoped that the robert sorby site would list angles, but, it does not:

    https://www.robert-sorby.co.uk/woodw...framing-chisel

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    1,095
    The bucket is a tool too!
    For $5 you did well.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    I'm new to the hand tool world, but is the socket not supposed to have the flare? I have an anvil and could try pounding it out cold.
    If your anvil has a small enough horn to smooth out the socket, that would likely be your easiest route. You may want to file, grind or sand the end. You would be surprised how often one's hand moves over the junction between metal and wood in use.

    If you end up buying more chisels or a group of chisels you are likely to end up with a few more needing socket rehabilitation. Here are a couple more threads on socket rehab:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?252884

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?212099

    I will definitely try the tapering jig. What material should I make the handle from? Is there a specific length it should be? Can I make it with hand tools or do I need a lathe?
    As others have said you do not need a lathe if you can shape the wood some other way. For me it was easy to find turned pieces from old furniture for handles.

    The material for the handle depends on what is inexpensive in your area. If ash is available it is good, hickory is very good. If you are going to only be using it as a slick and pushing by hand then other woods could be used. If you do want to use a figured or exotic wood, you may want to wait until you have a lathe.

    The length of the handle also should be determined by what you will be doing with this chisel. Mallet work might need a shorter handle than paring work.

    You might consider putting your location in your profile. There may be a member close to you who would be happy to help you rehab this chisel or turn a handle for you.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 09-05-2019 at 2:15 PM. Reason: moved a comma
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •