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Thread: Pneumatic Angled Drill/Sander?

  1. #1
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    Pneumatic Angled Drill/Sander?

    After installing a relatively elaborate air system to my home shop I became appreciative of pneumatic tools over comparable electric ones. I've been using Milwaukee angled drill motors for my lathe sanding but the collection of dust inside of the tool, heat buildup and overall bulk prompted me to search for a better solution. I recently purchased a Sioux pneumatic angle drill but today I ran across a used Jet pneumatic angled drill that was considerably smaller. I would've purchased it but thought I might be able to find the same thing new or in better shape. I did a search on the Jet website and elsewhere but haven't been able to find the exact same thing. Sorry but there wasn't a model number on the tool. Anyone have a lead on it?

  2. #2
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    Look at the rpm of the pneumatic tools. Sand paper can be overheated very quickly, as can velcro interface pads. Effective sanding on the lathe is best done with slow lathe and sander rpm. In my experience, pneumatic tool torque drops dramatically with slow rpm.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Look at the rpm of the pneumatic tools. Sand paper can be overheated very quickly, as can velcro interface pads. Effective sanding on the lathe is best done with slow lathe and sander rpm. In my experience, pneumatic tool torque drops dramatically with slow rpm.
    Good point, one that I did not consider. I still plan to give it a try whether with the Sioux or smaller tool that was mentioned if found. One feature of the Jet tool mentioned is the exhaust is in front. I thought it might clear the work of sanding dust.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    Good point, one that I did not consider. I still plan to give it a try whether with the Sioux or smaller tool that was mentioned if found. One feature of the Jet tool mentioned is the exhaust is in front. I thought it might clear the work of sanding dust.
    Well front exhaust will blow oil/water from the compressor/tool on to the work.
    When working I had more money than time. In retirement I have more time than money. Love the time, miss the money.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    After installing a relatively elaborate air system to my home shop I became appreciative of pneumatic tools over comparable electric ones. I've been using Milwaukee angled drill motors for my lathe sanding but the collection of dust inside of the tool, heat buildup and overall bulk prompted me to search for a better solution. I recently purchased a Sioux pneumatic angle drill but today I ran across a used Jet pneumatic angled drill that was considerably smaller. I would've purchased it but thought I might be able to find the same thing new or in better shape. I did a search on the Jet website and elsewhere but haven't been able to find the exact same thing. Sorry but there wasn't a model number on the tool. Anyone have a lead on it?
    Instead of a pneumatic angle drill, you might consider a pneumatic random orbital sander. I use three at the lathe, one palm sander with 3" disks and two of the Grex like this, usually with 2" disks but sometimes 1":

    grex_ROS.jpgN

    The Grex is light in weight, quite small, and variable speed. I love the way it sands very gently at lower speeds. Once I learned how to use NRS and cabinet scrapers I haven't used my angle drill for sanding even once. I often start sanding with the little random orbital sanders at 320 or finer grit. (I do all face-work sanding off the lathe or with the lathe turned off.)

    Here is the palm sander in use:

    sanding_IMG_20171212_094330_319.jpg

    JKJ

  6. #6
    I have one of the Sioux pneumatic angle drills and don't use it . Mostly it keeps the compressor running non stop. Add to that the possibility of oil drips on the wood, just not worth it.

    robo hippy

  7. #7
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    Have you looked into putting something like an old sock over the vents on the drill? The Neiko style drill has vents near the trigger and chuck which could catch the fabric. Not sure which Milwaukee you have but the 0370-20 has vents much further back from the chuck. It looks like you could safely put something to cut down on the dust that enters it. I don't use a drill much as it tends to remove a lot of material faster than I would like but I have looked into getting that model right angle drill.

    Maybe I'm cheap but running a compressor with a much bigger motor to supply air to a tool to sand or drill (along with dealing with the much thicker air hose vs electric cord) seams wrong. I do like that Grex DA John posted. The comparable electric ones I have see so far only go down to 3" and dust could be an issue. It would be nice to have something as compact as possible to do the insides of a bowl.

  8. #8
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    For the bowl insides one trick that is great is to use a 6-12" extension with your small sanding pad. In your left hand use a folded paper towel to guide the sanding disc and the right to hold the drill. The drill does not hafta go in the bowl--just the shaft and pad. You can use any drill or flex shaft this way and is easy to access the tight spots. Careful with the sock thing--the motor need free air to cool it.
    Last edited by robert baccus; 09-09-2019 at 10:48 PM.

  9. #9
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    High rpm air grinders ect. work well on small areas --control the heat and wood removal by grit choice and pressure. Let the rpm's do the work--fine grits are much hotter than coarse grits and low pressure.

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