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Thread: Mini wood lathe for my Son

  1. #1

    Mini wood lathe for my Son

    It's a high time for my son to learn woodworking,so I am thinking to start guiding him by using a mini wood lathe,thinking to buy a used one as obvious it will be cheap than a new one but still will look for the suggestion on new one too.

    And please also share your experiences on teaching your kids about this skill.It will help me out to get new ideas about the teaching method .



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inver Grove Heights, MN
    Posts
    669
    Allan, teaching kids is one of the most fun things you can do. It is also very valuable for the future of our hobby. When my grandsons were 7 and 8 they started turning Christmas gifts for their teachers. We started with pens, proceeded to snowmen, birdhouses, and then to small bowls. Their grandmother took photos of the process and created cards for the teachers showing the kids and the process. They don't turn a lot, but at 12 and 13 they still plan to turning gifts this year. They have also turned several magic wands for their friends. My only advise is to make something for them to stand on if they are young/short, and start with something that won't take longer than their attention span. Pens are a good place to start.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Williams View Post
    Allan, teaching kids is one of the most fun things you can do. It is also very valuable for the future of our hobby. When my grandsons were 7 and 8 they started turning Christmas gifts for their teachers. We started with pens, proceeded to snowmen, birdhouses, and then to small bowls. Their grandmother took photos of the process and created cards for the teachers showing the kids and the process. They don't turn a lot, but at 12 and 13 they still plan to turning gifts this year. They have also turned several magic wands for their friends. My only advise is to make something for them to stand on if they are young/short, and start with something that won't take longer than their attention span. Pens are a good place to start.
    It's great to know they started learning turning Christmas gifts at a very young age 7 and 8,my son is 12 now I think this age is better to get started to learn woodworking I think will start to teach him with some basic about the machine parts then will go for pen thinking to teach them on mini wood lathe do you have any suggestion about this and could you post some picture of your grandson art piece

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    171
    I would check your local Craigslist ads, also might try Facebook Marketplace. Would not be afraid of a used machine at all! Some common names come to mind; Grizzly, Jet, Delta, Rikon...............
    I have a Grizzly bench-top model, it has the digital readout as well, have also heard that this readout can go blank or not operate properly. Mine has been humming along just fine for over 4 years.
    At least you will not or should not have to buy duplicate tooling!!
    Teach your kids to make their own carbide insert handles as well, that would be a good first project. Then they will get to turn their own stuff with the tool that they made, how cool!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,161
    Jak there might be a woodturning club in your area. Members often have lathes they are selling or know of someone who is.

  6. #6
    There is a 12 x 21 Jet on my local list for $295. Seems very reasonable.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jak Kelly View Post
    I would check your local Craigslist ads, also might try Facebook Marketplace. Would not be afraid of a used machine at all! Some common names come to mind; Grizzly, Jet, Delta, Rikon...............
    I have a Grizzly bench-top model, it has the digital readout as well, have also heard that this readout can go blank or not operate properly. Mine has been humming along just fine for over 4 years.
    At least you will not or should not have to buy duplicate tooling!!
    Teach your kids to make their own carbide insert handles as well, that would be a good first project. Then they will get to turn their own stuff with the tool that they made, how cool!!!
    Yeah I am looking for craigslist ads most of the time I don't use facebook as such I am not used to it I have requested for joining a group and how much does Grizzly bench-top model cost you,regarding the carbide insert handles I have kept in to teach list thanks for the suggestion and also has to teach him handling these tools can be dangerous for the new user and mostly new user drop the tools which breaks the tip of these tools or harm themselves using one.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    There is a 12 x 21 Jet on my local list for $295. Seems very reasonable.
    Could you share me the link so that I can have a look at it I have checked the price for mini wood lathe here https://topreviewedten.com/best-mini-wood-lathe/ it cost is 299.9$ . The lathe you are mentioning is it a new one?

  9. #9

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inver Grove Heights, MN
    Posts
    669
    In addition to my midi lathe I have a 6" Atlas/Craftsman metal lathe. The first year the grandsons turned pens on it. That way they were never too close to sharp tools. The youngest still likes to turn hand wheels rather than hold tools. I'll dig up some of my wife's photos for you. I think 12 is a better age to start because of the attention span shortness at 8.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Arin View Post
    Yeah I am looking for Craigslist ads most of the time I don't use Facebook as such I am not used to it I have requested for joining a group and how much does Grizzly bench-top model cost you,regarding the carbide insert handles I have kept in to teach list thanks for the suggestion and also has to teach him handling these tools can be dangerous for the new user and mostly new user drop the tools which breaks the tip of these tools or harm themselves using one.
    Get on Facebook, it is actually pretty darn good for buying used stuff as some of it goes really cheap. Nobody says you gotta post pictures of your daily lunch or give everyone "likes".
    I used some aluminum 3/4" stock to make my carbide holders, steel might be a better choice but seems to work just fine for me, plus aluminum is easier to drill, tap and file. I just made a handle out of hard maple, drilled the end big enough to accept 4" or so deep of the 3/4" aluminum stock and epoxied them together. Wish I would have made all of my own carbide holders first and saved the $$$$.
    I can't remember the exact cost of my lathe, maybe $375 plus freight, so $450, maybe $475 total?? Grizzly has a web site and their similar machine to mine looks like it is about $425 now, with a 3/4hp motor.
    I have heard good things about Rikon and Jet as well. I am in no way trying to steer you towards a specific product line. Also check Pennstate industries as they always have a small lathe in their catalogs. You just want to make sure that you get one that is MT#2 and 1" x 8TPI I do believe.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,422
    I would suggest also checking out the Nova Comet II. It often is advertised as package, but the electronic VS, reverse, and wide speed range. Major complaint is the lack of power in the slow speed pulley range but that is seldom used. I have one for working with new turners, travel to classes, and doing small things. I am about to be restricted to using it for the next 3 to 6 months and not use my Powermatic 3520B after some surgery due to weight restrictions (force just loosening the tailstock or banjo lock exceeds limit). I have been building up smaller projects to do during that time. I have pen blanks, wood for small lidded boxes, rough turned bowls under 12"D along with bowl blanks, small vase stock, etc. I often use it for smaller work over the larger lathe.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    8,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Arin View Post
    It's a high time for my son to learn woodworking,so I am thinking to start guiding him by using a mini wood lathe,thinking to buy a used one as obvious it will be cheap than a new one but still will look for the suggestion on new one too.

    And please also share your experiences on teaching your kids about this skill.It will help me out to get new ideas about the teaching method .
    Alan,

    I've worked with a lot of kids aged 6 and up to introduce and teach them some woodturning.

    Are you an experienced woodturner? If so, yes, get a lathe, any lathe, and start right away!

    If not, you might want to get some experienced before getting a lathe and start introducing your son to woodturning. It might be best to find a teacher/mentor who will give some initial guidance and demonstrate the basics. This way your son (and you) can get a feel for the process and discover if woodturning is something he wants to do. You are sure to find an experienced woodturner willing to invest some time in a child - attend a local woodturning club meeting and ask one of the club leaders before the meeting. I don't see your locating indicated in your profile but if you are near me bring him over.

    With most kids I don't start in with lessons but start more with a demonstration with some hands-on from the kids, depending on the age, maturity, and interest. Kids as young as 6 can help, lay out projects, do some assisted turning, and sand and finish. Older kids may be ready and able to do more.

    I think it is important to start out the very first session with the goal of finishing some kind of simple project, something the youngster can take with them. Sessions should be short, long enough to do something but short enough to not exceed his attention span. The last thing you want is for him to get bored or feel like it's a chore or for things to seem too hard or complicated. My grandson loves to make presents so we have done a variety of things, all simple. After a few sessions we started on more complicated things, but all still simple enough to complete in an hour.

    Some kids at the lathe, ages 8 to 14:

    alex_wand_IMG_20160118_1313.jpg alex_wand_IMG_20160118_1327.jpg Alex_presents_2017.jpg

    jaden_img_1254.jpg Lindsay_IMG_7242.jpg Lindsay_IMG_7247.jpg

    WV_boys_IMG_20170319_154641_356.jpg

    Rebecca01_comp_IMG_7684.jpg

    Oh, if you can't see the pictures it may be because you are a "Member" instead of "Contributor".
    Contributor level is only $6/year min and can greatly enhance your forum time. https://sawmillcreek.org/payments.php

    JKJ

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Hilbert Jr View Post
    It looks good and thanks for sharing the link it looks a great market place

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