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Thread: wearing gloves when using machinery

  1. #31
    Interesting responses from those supporting the use of gloves. In my case, when I was a kid I had my Dad's drill and when finished with the hole I laid the drill aside. I had inadvertently hit the Dead man switch on the drill and the bit caught my shirt tail and began, very quickly, winding itself in my shirt heading towards my throat. Today it is like looking back at a cartoon, but at the time i was very seriously flailing around on the floor with both hands holding that darned drill for all I was worth. All clothing, including gloves are front of mind for me as a result, so no. No gloves for me.

  2. #32
    I sometimes wear tight fitting gloves in winter when it gets too cold to work without them but otherwise don't. When I do wear gloves I take extra time to be more careful. It's just too dangerous to do for no reason.

  3. #33
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    Get a slider and throw away your pushsticks.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    I would not ever wear gloves near machinery, tight fitting or otherwise.
    +1 Never.

    Good way to get pulled into the whirled peas...kinda like stepping into the bight of a line.
    Q: When is it safe to step into a bight of line?
    A: Never.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Reverb View Post
    +1 Never.

    Good way to get pulled into the whirled peas...kinda like stepping into the bight of a line.
    Q: When is it safe to step into a bight of line?
    A: Never.
    Bight of a line? Thanks. Had to look that up!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Barry View Post
    Bight of a line? Thanks. Had to look that up!
    Standard USCG test question...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    I had inadvertently hit the Dead man switch on the drill and the bit caught my shirt tail and began, very quickly, winding itself in my shirt heading towards my throat.
    I once did the same thing, except with an angle grinder and wire wheel. Eye-opening.

  7. #37
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    Depends on the materials

    I've never used gloves in my shop, other than to move rough lumber around.

    However, I just recently started volunteering with a group that builds basic furniture for a local furniture bank that provides furniture for those in need. The materials are seconds/defective sheet goods, mostly melamine, donated by a furniture company. We cut maybe a thousand parts a day on 2 table saws. With the extremely sharp edges and slippery surface of melamine parts, we have to wear abrasion/cut resistant gloves or our hands would be dripping blood. I proved that to myself in the first hour of the first day I was on the job. Our gloves also need to have grip in the finger tips.

    The gloves we use generally are thin with rubberized coating on the finger tips. I have better performance with the gloves than without when pushing material through the saws as sweaty hands could easily slip on the slick surface and end up in the blade or cut on an edge.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  8. #38
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    No personal horror tale to tell, here.

    I was trained that the ONLY acceptible gloves are easily torn gloves, like nitrile gloves.

    Family members who used to work in the ER have seen fingers pulled from hands because of gloves getting caught.

    No matter how safely I work or how safe an operation appears to be, they're called "accidents" because something DID NOT happen as expected.

  9. #39
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    I have only made one exception, and that was when I was working with Wenge.
    To quote my 1st shop teacher;
    "No rings, watches, jewelry, loose shirts, or long hair around machinery.
    And no gloves! "

  10. #40
    A panel saw would eliminate push sticks too but don't have space for one of those either.

  11. #41
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    Vibrating machinery = Yes. Spinning machinery = No.

    Charley

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