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Thread: Fritz & Franz jig vs parallel positioner?

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Toronto Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Dean View Post
    Have you experienced any issues with the wood moving around in the FF jig?
    Hi Howard, mine has T slot moulding in the faces, no it doesn’t slip.

    I use mine for cross-cutting, ripping and cutting tapers…..regards, Rod

  2. #47
    I have a parallel device but it doesn't see much use except for occasional wide rips. It takes a minute to clamp on the carriage and then it is another thing to maneuver around. It would be more useful with a flip stop.

    My Fritz and Frans drop into the table slot instantly when needed, have flip stops and scales for up to 12" cuts, don't slip with sandpaper glued to the faces and hang over the left side of the carriage only a couple of inches. I use them a lot, for short crosscuts, long and short parallel rips and tapers.

    I use the rip fence too, as a bump stop, and conventionally for rips longer than the carriage travel and for ripping long narrow strips that can't be held securely on the carriage.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Perth, Australia
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    8,392
    I use this one a lot ...



    Details here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Powered...rK3Slider.html

    Much preferred to a F&F - greater precision and repeatability.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Crozet, VA
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    528
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Dean View Post
    Many thanks. This is helpful. I’m many months still from receiving the K3 79x48 I ordered the other day, so am taking the opportunity to do some research on what jigs to build. I see that some people are FF devotees (for both small and rip cuts), some prefer a parallel fence, and some use both. I’m looking for simple and repeatable accuracy with as little fiddling as possible.
    Howard -- I use both depending on the cut, but the F&F sees way more action in every day usage than the parallel positioner. As others have mentioned, its easier to take on and off quickly. Now, if I'm building a bank of cabinets and need to rip a whole bunch of cabinet sides, then the parallel positioner comes out.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  5. #50
    All very helpful. Many thanks!

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Alaska
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    533
    Howard - It would seem you and I are on the same path. I just ordered the 79X48 saw as well, and have been researching the various jigs and devices to use with the machine. The F&F jig looks to be a no-brainer for me and I will most definitely make one. Gotta admit, I have not heard of the parallel positioner till I saw this thread. I'm not sure if I'd use/need it...., but one can never had too many widgets I suppose.

    Had you had opportunity to watch any of this guy's slider saw videos on Youtube (extreem woodworker)? I've learned quite a few things that I'll apply to my machine when I arrives. This is one where he updates his F&F jig to allow for easier use. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OokHlPj4vqQ

  7. #52
    I've made some F&F's with sandpaper, but a rubber material seems to work better. McMaster sells 1" tall strips, 1/32" thick, in a 3' roll for $5. https://www.mcmaster.com/9023K79/

  8. #53
    Hi Michael. Yes I have seen those videos on YouTube. It seems that an FF jig can serve dual purposes (cross cut small pieces and rip boards). I’ll need do some more research to get a better sense of what I want to do. I might ultimately build off of Derek’s design and either use aluminum extrusion or repurpose an Incra cross cut fence.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Alaska
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Dean View Post
    Hi Michael. Yes I have seen those videos on YouTube. It seems that an FF jig can serve dual purposes (cross cut small pieces and rip boards). I’ll need do some more research to get a better sense of what I want to do. I might ultimately build off of Derek’s design and either use aluminum extrusion or repurpose an Incra cross cut fence.
    Well there is no rule that says you can't have both....

    Derek's jig looks way to amazing to not make. I have already printed that design and dropped in my folder of 'things to do'.....

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Derek is the master when it comes to fixtures like this!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Derek is the master when it comes to fixtures like this!
    Indeed he is. I think I've said on here before that Derek's jigs are nicer than any of my projects.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
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    I am new to sliding table saws myself. What is a parallel positioner?

    I have watched MANY youtube videos on sliding table saws... but I would appreciate any recommendation for good sliding table saw videos, especially ones that highlight different ways to use a sliding table saw.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Schuch View Post
    I am new to sliding table saws myself. What is a parallel positioner?

    I have watched MANY youtube videos on sliding table saws... but I would appreciate any recommendation for good sliding table saw videos, especially ones that highlight different ways to use a sliding table saw.
    These are devices that attach to the slider's wagon to allow one to take a piece of material that has a straight edge and create a cut parallel to that edge by moving the wagon. It's the equivalent of parallel ripping with a fence, but using just the saw wagon. It's accurate and the quality of cut tends to be excellent because the material is being supported while moving through the cut by the wagon...in many cases, folks will actually clamp down the material. The quality of cut can be so good, assuming that the board is flat, that no edge jointing is necessary.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Allentown, PA
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    While we're on the subject, has anyone sourced (or makes and will sell) metal inserts for the Felder X-Roll channel with a threaded hole, ideally 5/16". I'd like to leave these in the channel and attach jigs by screwing them into two inserts. For example, if I were skilled enough to copy Derek's parallel device, I'd use two inserts to hold it in place. Right now, I do something similar to attach clamps; but using wood, which doesn't have the same tolerances and longevity.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Mike, make your own out of something like scrap oak and use threaded inserts. That's what I did for the Minimax slider. You can mill the wood for a slip fit and the cost is very nice.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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