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Thread: Making Crooked Boards Straight

  1. #16
    Much of what I buy is 8'-10' surfaced 4/4 teak and mahogany, so is very quick to straighten with the track saw. And I regularly need long lengths for the yacht work, unlike building furniture.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Three Rivers, Central Oregon
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    2,218
    My hardwood supplier will straight line any length for $0.10/be ft. Most of my work involves <6' lengths and it's usually not a big deal to straighten on the jointer. If I need longer stock straight lined then I pay the 10 cents. The OP has come up with a clever solution and I've done something very similar in the past on 14' boards. Track saw is nice but for me is too pricey, and cumbersome given the setup involved. Each to their own, eh?
    Scott Vroom

    If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

    Bernard Baruch

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    Much of what I buy is 8'-10' surfaced 4/4 teak and mahogany, so is very quick to straighten with the track saw. And I regularly need long lengths for the yacht work, unlike building furniture.
    Makes good sense for that use.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Oakland, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott vroom View Post
    I question the wisdom of wearing gloves while operating a table saw.
    I appreciate the concern for safety unfortunately I suffer from severe arthritis in both hands. This is as close to a fist as I can make.
    P1020499.JPG

    The textured coating on the gloves I use increases my gripping strength and allows me to handle material more easy and safely. These gloves fit tight. If the glove became entangled, my hand would have been to close to the blade in the first place.
    Last edited by Tipton Lum; 08-26-2019 at 7:36 PM.

  5. #20
    hey Brian, I pictured you using an ink line and Japanese saw?

  6. #21
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    Aug 2013
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    Princeton, NJ
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    I've done it that way plenty of times, but I do this way now so that I can make a living. Ripping 12/4 anything by hand is a time consuming affair.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Posts
    347
    I use an ink line, but then skip the hand ripping and go straight to the bandsaw
    That's just like, your opinion, man.

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