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Thread: Lawn Weeds

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    49,630
    Bill, I would think you could get clover seed easily from a farm supply like Agway or something locally equivalent. Note there are different types of clover and ideally, you'd select a variety or two that are honeybee and other pollinator friendly.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    I see they are now pushing a new improved Lippia grass for the western states.
    Bill D.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    SE PA, Central Bucks County
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    245
    It's yellow nutsedge and prosedge will get rid of it (at least control it). Nutsedge is rhizomatous and stubborn, so pulling blade clumps is futile. I personally would never use glyphosate (aka RoundUp) on anything. So you can either control it with something like prosedge, or make peace with it accepting the fact that it does spread aggressively.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Landenberg, Pa
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    216
    That's a much bigger cutter and setup than my operation. I just have a 52in deck on a John Deere, and I'll eventually tow the tank behind that. But if hand spraying works (yeh it takes a while, but whatever, I'm outside) I might just keep up with that. This product is so potent that it doesn't take much.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    I don't know how much you want to cover, but that boom welded on the back of my 7' rotary cutter (post 17 in this thread) is a replacement boom for an "ATV sprayer" that covers a 30 foot swath. The tow behind mower sprayers typically cover 80". The two pumps are so I can flip switches on the tractor dash, and either spot spray, or cover the 30 foot swath. I'm planning to put better quality tips on that boom for next year. I don't know if they put wheels on any of those ATV rigs.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
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    12,163
    I used SedgeEnder. It appears to have worked quickly and effectively. I am surprised, since we are at the end of the season, and it's supposed to be used shortly after emergence in the early summer.

    I also have an infestation of Spotted Spurge. I am just hand picking this a bit every day.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    4,057
    Quote Originally Posted by William Chain View Post
    That's a much bigger cutter and setup than my operation. I just have a 52in deck on a John Deere, and I'll eventually tow the tank behind that. But if hand spraying works (yeh it takes a while, but whatever, I'm outside) I might just keep up with that. This product is so potent that it doesn't take much.
    I knew you didn't need the 40 gallon tank, but the ATV rig comes with a small tank normally. I just bought the replacement boom, since it will cover a 30 foot swath, but still doesn't stick out past the sides of that 7' rotary cutter. I was just suggesting to look at the ATV sprayers if you wanted to cover a wider area than the typical 80 inches. I don't know if they are offered with wheels, or just come to fit on the back of four wheelers.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Winchester VA
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    22
    I know how to fix it. Get a herd of goats, they eat everything and don't use gas. They emit it.

    Gotta have a smart ass

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    3,016
    I have heard that given a choice goats will eat poison oak before anything else. it has a nice tangy taste to them. the little ones like the milk from Mom. But people who drink the milk get sick sick sick. Not sure about eating the meat.
    Bill D.

  9. After spending a year getting the area around the house to sprout anything, I am just happy that it is green. I can't see weed and feed and then constantly mowing it because it suddenly goes through a growth spurt. We live pretty far back off the beaten path and get no drive by folks. So I really don't care whether the dogs play on grass or dandelions and plantains. The grass seed I put down came up and was at first very spotty, but it is slowly filling in and choking out some of the weeds.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
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    12,163

    Circling back...

    A month+ later, my lawn has improved considerably. Thank you for all your help, Guys. Am grateful to have access to so much experience in a variety of fields here.

    Sedge Ender worked very well. It killed only the sedge, and left the surrounding turf unaffected. Within 1 week, the plants began to die. I roughed up the soil in between, reseeded, and then picked out the dead plants over the course of the next few weeks. No new sedge has emerged (yet!)

    I also started cutting the lawn at 4". Like my teenager's hair, it's shaggy but looks healthy.

    I also realized that there is no substitution for persistence and old fashioned mechanical weeding. That has kept most of the leafy weeds at bay - except one...

    My new nemeses is spotted spurge. I have months to prepare for Battle Royale 2020...

    I also have some bright green areas that I think are poa (2nd pic); I believe these areas just get too much water.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 09-18-2019 at 8:32 AM.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
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    3,831
    The advisability of cutting grass longer as a weed control mechanism depends on the grass species and variety. For example, If you had Tifton 328 (Tifgreen) Bermuda, the best way to suppress weeds is to cut the grass very close to the ground. As the name implies, this cultivar is used on golf greens in Southern climates and naturally grows quite short. Taller grasses can't tolerate the near scalping and will not thrive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The best thing I ever did for "weed control" in our lawn was to start cutting it much higher...3.5"-4". I've never used chemicals. Yes, there are still some "weeds" but new ones struggle to get a foothold because the taller, thriving grass blocks the sunlight and makes germination conditions less than ideal for "weeds". Most "weeds" thrive in poor soil where there is plenty of light available to them.

    To get things stable as a baseline, you could indeed do a "wipe and replace", but you could also do things like core aeration followed by over seeding of a good grass seed (not inexpensive seed) that is suitable for your lawn's light conditions. As the new grass grows in and establishes a strong root system, it should spread and fill in between the aeration points. Using corn gluten meal very early in the subsequent season should help keep germination of new "weeds" (which are generally annuals) down to a minimum.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    49,630
    That's really looking good, Prashun. It looks healthy and lush As I mentioned earlier, I actually like the longer length in general and it's been helpful with the weed thing, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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