Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17

Thread: SCMS and Dimensional Lumber

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    2,636

    SCMS and Dimensional Lumber

    I have a question about the subject matter. Once in a while I have a project requiring dimensional lumber. This time I'm building a floating deck at my wife's request. For the framing I purchased a bunch of 2x8's it 8' & 10' lengths.

    I set up my miter saw to cut these to length and had several cuts that had the blade start to bind and try to push the saw back at me a bit. I ended up using a circular saw.

    In years past I have used a SCMS for these kinds of cuts and didn't remember this happening, but, I have changed something. I had a Makita corded SCMS for years and recently (maybe year ago) replaced it with a cordless Makita (36V).

    Wondering:

    1) I'm thinking that the boards aren't perfectly flat/square so at the end of the cut it causes the blade to bind?
    2) Corded saw has more power and doesn't slow down as much when it starts to bind?
    3) I have the OEM blade on the saw. Maybe blade is causing the issue?

    Input appreciated.

    Thanks
    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    90
    Mike, you're probably right on all three.
    1) Dimensional lumber can be warped and pinch the blade
    2) May not have the "umph" to get through sometimes, especially after a lot of cuts
    3) A negative rake tooth blade will help a lot
    It's never too late to have a happy childhood.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    57
    Check your support situation on both sides of the blade. If the board is bowed (or if the outer supports are too high) such that the board is not flat on the table, then the board will flex downward as the cut is made and pinch the blade.

    One thing that might help a lot is to clamp the board down within a few inches of the cut. My old Makita LS1013 SCMS has a clamp the mounts to a post behind the fence and can be swiveled into position when needed. I use this a lot, especially with long boards.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,587
    You may need to resort to clamping the material when using construction grade lumber as it often has "features" that don't play nice with CMS or SCMS cuts.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    2,636
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    You may need to resort to clamping the material when using construction grade lumber as it often has "features" that don't play nice with CMS or SCMS cuts.
    Is it just me or do others find it difficult to work with dimensional lumber after being use to milling lumber yourself?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,495
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Goetzke View Post
    Is it just me or do others find it difficult to work with dimensional lumber after being use to milling lumber yourself?
    Mike, I was going to be a smartass and say that I find that dimensional lumber makes great firewood, just doesn't make anything straight.

    Then I realized it makes far worse firewood than the hardwood scraps from stuff I've milled myself.

    Now I'm thinking maybe the only thing dimensional lumber is good at making is profits for Home Depot........Regards, Rod.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    5,271
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Goetzke View Post
    Is it just me or do others find it difficult to work with dimensional lumber after being use to milling lumber yourself?
    Completely agree. These are facts I have to consider whenever using the stuff:
    1) boards are never straight
    2) boards are never the same length
    3) boards are never the same height
    4) boards are never the same width (thickness)
    5) 2x material is not meant to be used by a furniture maker thatís used to precision!! Especially PT lumber!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,268
    Even when making jigs and forms, I mill dimensional stuff to 1.25". Makes me feel a little better about using it. My SCMS will also get pinched with Hickory or Hard Maple unless I take shallow cuts. I assume the design of a moving blade causes some vibration under heavy load that pinches the plate. Most SCMS blades have a heavy plate very little distance from the edge of the tooth to that plate. Dave

  9. #9
    I also think it's all 3.

    I switched from a corded circular saw to the makita 36v cordless, and I also notice some binding.

    These weaker saws (but oh how convenient!!!!) probably can't forgive anything out of perfectly true.

  10. #10
    One thing that has changed is that dimensional lumber is now generally at 14% moisture or even a bit higher and is made from the center cuts of the logs. The rpms of your battery powered saw are probably slower than the corded saws.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,587
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Goetzke View Post
    Is it just me or do others find it difficult to work with dimensional lumber after being use to milling lumber yourself?
    Honestly...yes. I don't particularly enjoy working with any kind of "construction" lumber at this point. I like flat and straight and that's what I get when I process my own. But alas...sometimes one must do what one must do...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,053
    Were you pushing, or pulling for the cut?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Woodstock, VA
    Posts
    797
    Mike,
    If you can find where you live try Weyerhaeuser framer series lumber. It's southern yellow pine, a little more expensive, but it's straight and dried properly.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,053
    I'll agree with that. Framer series lumber is Yellow Pine framing lumber like it used to be. I used it building these trusses in an 1850 attic to fix a terribly sagging roof. I haven't seen YP framing lumber that nice, and stable since the last local mill went under in 1992. The access opening we had into that attic is the white lined squarish opening near the junction box, on the other side of the light. Main chords are 2x12x16's.

    Last edited by Tom M King; 08-21-2019 at 6:42 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Woodstock, VA
    Posts
    797
    That's a nice looking truss Tom!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •