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Thread: Tall Case Oak Clock

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Landenberg, Pa
    Posts
    206
    Wrapping this thing up....

    The slats on the sides are removable - these are made from 1/4-in thick stock, ripped into strips. The strips are then rabbeted and dadoed for half-lap joints, so 1/8-in deep on those. Fit together, a couple passes through the drum sander to sneak up on the right fit, and they fit in the 1/4-in grooves and rabbets machined into the sides. I lost the photos of me doing the rabbets for those, but it was a climb cut into to stop the tearout which I learned the hard way. Fortunately the tearout did not damage anything, and the climb cut corrected that. You can fit and remove the slats from outside the case, allowing access to the chime hammers and works. The slats get the acoustic cloth (my wife cut and hotglued that on) after finishing.

    rabbet.jpgslatparts.jpgslatsglued.jpgfitted1.jpgfitted2.jpg

    The door was fitted with the self closing 3/8-in hinges to accommodate the rabbet on the door. And blocks for the leveling feet.

    doordryfit.jpgdoordryfit2.jpgfeet2.jpg

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Landenberg, Pa
    Posts
    206
    Ok last bit -

    The finish I achieved in three stages. After several test pieces, I settled on the following. I started with sanding to 180 grit. All brad holes from the trim I filled with a custom mix of oak sanding dust and titebond III. My own wood filler if you like. Sand that down to 180, holes filled. Then I applied Lockwood #87 Golden Brown ethanol soluble dye, 1 oz / 4 pints ethanol. I mixed up 2 pints of this (so 0.5 oz in 2 pints), and ended up using half of it. I wiped this on with a microfiber cloth. Though I did several test pieces, this still put in a panic. Note that I did the door and slats separately, but I fitted them for photos. The panels float, so I manually moved them around to make sure I got the edges that might become visible as the wood expands and contracts.

    dye1.jpgdye2.jpg

    Step 2 was to apply an oil based dark walnut stain - I landed on Varathane quick dry dark walnut stain. Not the regular yellow can, not the gel stain, but the quick dry stuff in the white can. Its consistency is in between the yellow can and the gel stain. I tested them all on top of the dye on scrap, and liked the color from this product. I applied with a microfiber towel, let it sit 3 minutes, then wiped it off.

    stain1.jpgstain2.jpgstain3.jpg

    Photos do not do it justice. It was spot-on what I was looking for in tone and depth. I let that dry a week. On top of that went 2 coats of wipe-on poly, I used Watco and a microfiber towel. I like this more than Minwax, but I've used Minwax too on other stuff. I hit the whole lot with a maroon scotch pad in between applications, then a vac and a tack cloth.

    From there, fitted the movement, fitted the face, and then the glass. That went in with 1/4-in square retainers made from scrap secured with #2 brass wood screws, per the recommendation from a member here in another thread. Thanks to those folks in that thread.

    retainer.jpgfinal.jpg

    Took me a week of messing with the pedulum to get it running with accurate time (one week later and its still bang-on, so I guess I got it right). I am just thrilled to bits with it, and grateful for all the help on here with some of the little fiddly parts and the suggestions. I'm happy to help anyone with their clock project, I made plenty of mistakes and managed to recover from them all - reply here or message me.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Landenberg, Pa
    Posts
    206
    Norm's prescription for the job... I thought about changing the pocket screws, but because it's just the face frame, buried and never to be seen again I went with it.

    I'm very happy with the design. Fits right in with our home.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    I love the design. Simple elegance. I too am a QSWO fan. Regarding the pocket screw joinery....well played sir. You took a potential headache and executed a low risk alternative with flawless results. Smells like win to me.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Leesville, SC
    Posts
    2,216
    Great looking clock, great looking lumber, and great craftsmanship... You should be proud.
    Army Veteran 1968 - 1970
    NRA Lifetime Member
    I Support the Second Amendment of the US Constitution

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    558
    Thanks for all the details and pics. Especially the clock info - I've dealt with Klockit before and they are really helpful. Having the numbers of the items you used is great.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

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