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Thread: Electrical Advice for New Shop

  1. #1

    Electrical Advice for New Shop

    Hey everyone! Well, after many years James is finally getting his own shop for his woodworking. My question or should I say his question is what size/kind of electrical cable would he need to run 200 amps, 300 feet. Here is one that we’ve found but not 100% sure it will work. Not sure if the link is allowed, if not please delete.

    https://www.wireandcableyourway.com/...SABEgILO_D_BwE

    Any advise is much appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Zelma
    God Bless,
    James & Zelma (Psalm 18:2)
    "Inscriptions Of The Heart"
    Texas
    ~A person is only as good as their word~

  2. #2
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    There are far too many variables to simply recommend a cable. I work in the electrical utility industry and I wouldn't mess with running a 200A service to my shop. I'd either have the local utility create a new service at the shop or pay a local electrician to do the work if it's going to sub off your existing service. That ensures that it will be done to code and properly inspected (assuming inspections are required in your municipality).

    Scott

  3. #3
    I'd like to jump in here and say IMO forums are not the place to be asking electrical questions of this nature.

    That said, does your local government allow homeowners to install power services?

    When I had a dedicated service run to my shop, I had to have a permit and hire an electrician or the power company would not install the transformer. The county will issue a homeowners permit for basic wiring, but a service has to be installed by a licensed electrician.

    Of course, doing it my self never even entered my mind...........just 2˘

  4. #4
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    I agree with the comment about too many variables...wire type, distance, method of installation, local codes, etc., all factor in to what is required. Your best resource for this is a licensed electrician who is familiar with both national code and local code.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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    I'm an electrician & have done this kind of installation many, many times. But I won't offer any advice other that what has been given above. There are lots of variables and each jurisdiction has different rules. And this is definitely is not a DIY project. Hire a pro.

    200A is a lot for a 1 person shop. What size will it be?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    I'm an electrician & have done this kind of installation many, many times. But I won't offer any advice other that what has been given above. There are lots of variables and each jurisdiction has different rules. And this is definitely is not a DIY project. Hire a pro.

    200A is a lot for a 1 person shop. What size will it be?
    Maybe a DIY type that really has no clue, but it doesn't take much research to find ampacity charts, voltage drop info, etc.

    I have 1400 Amps and I am afraid it may not be enough in the near future.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    Maybe a DIY type that really has no clue, but it doesn't take much research to find ampacity charts, voltage drop info, etc.
    There's a WHOLE lot more to the installation than that. Ampacity & voltage drop are the easy parts.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    There's a WHOLE lot more to the installation than that. Ampacity & voltage drop are the easy parts.
    They asked nothing about installing it, only if that was the correct wire, so like I said easy enough to find ampacity and voltage drop info.

    Notice I didn't explain anything to them.

    I am not a licensed electrician, but I have no issues with complicated motor controls, running 480v, 240v 3phase, transformers, etc. I am technically a DIY, but not the kind that goes to HD asking the warm body in the department's how to do something.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by James & Zelma Litzmann View Post
    Hey everyone! Well, after many years James is finally getting his own shop for his woodworking. My question or should I say his question is what size/kind of electrical cable would he need to run 200 amps, 300 feet. Here is one that we’ve found but not 100% sure it will work. Not sure if the link is allowed, if not please delete.

    https://www.wireandcableyourway.com/...SABEgILO_D_BwE

    Any advise is much appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Zelma
    Yikes! 200A is a lot. My shop runs nicely on 70. Are you welding? Do you have multiple people running machines at the same time? Or are you just thinking ahead?

    My shop has 20 4' LED fixtures that draw about 700 watts.
    Add to that my 1.5HP dust collector and a machine. My biggest is probably the 3HP table saw. I don't imagine that I come anywhere near the 70A.

    To be fair, I don't count HVAC because I'm in my basement so that's a load. But still...

  10. #10
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    I have 200 amp service to my shop...it was originally only 50 amp when it was a garage for the previous owners. 200 amp was pretty much the same cost as 100 amp, so that's what got installed and at this point I appreciate it with HVAC, DC and machinery running simultaneously.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    My electrical company in TN will run the cable for free for a new service but they require a certified electrician to install the meter box and breaker panel to get that free run from the transformer to the Meter box. I would first investigate if your electrical company has a similar program.

  12. #12
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    I too have 200 amps to my shop and when my 3 phase idler is on plus DC and table saw, plus someone else on the planer or jointer, I’m glad to have it. I have plenty of reserve right now but might have a CNC going concurrently in future. As Jim pointed out, it was much more to go from 100 to 200.

  13. #13
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    300 foot run is 600 feet on most tables so you will need to upsize the cable. How is your existing voltage and is the service drop able to handle another 200 amps? If your are in the country can the main line supply 400 amps?
    Bil lD

  14. #14
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    I'm a DIYer who has installed 100-200A subpanels both within the same building and in remote buildings on multiple occasions. I'm not aware of any difference between doing a 50 and 200A panel other than the difficulty of handling the wire. I pull proper permits and have them inspected, and have never had an issue with the inspector. You read the code and do what it says, it's hardly rocket surgery. Not sure what all the mystery here is about. Proper grounding in a remote building is about the only thing that's a little bit complicated. For new service I'll do everything up to the weatherhead; I let an electrician or the POCO make the hot connection after the inspections are done. For the kind of big heavy wire a 200 A service requires it may well be worthwhile to hire someone young and strong with equipment-- getting it bent to fit and make neat connections in a box is hard and pulls through long runs of conduit take a machine.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    I'm a DIYer who has installed 100-200A subpanels both within the same building and in remote buildings on multiple occasions. I'm not aware of any difference between doing a 50 and 200A panel other than the difficulty of handling the wire. I pull proper permits and have them inspected, and have never had an issue with the inspector. You read the code and do what it says, it's hardly rocket surgery. Not sure what all the mystery here is about. Proper grounding in a remote building is about the only thing that's a little bit complicated. For new service I'll do everything up to the weatherhead; I let an electrician or the POCO make the hot connection after the inspections are done. For the kind of big heavy wire a 200 A service requires it may well be worthwhile to hire someone young and strong with equipment-- getting it bent to fit and make neat connections in a box is hard and pulls through long runs of conduit take a machine.
    This is not meant as a knock on the OP, but if you are going on a woodworking forum to ask that kind of question, it indicates that this is not a DIY project that they should tackle. I agree, it's not 'rocket surgery' but it does require knowledge and skill that many DIYers to not possess. If you have seen as many DIY electrical installation done by people who felt they knew what they were doing, that were completely ****** up as I have, then you would understand my caution.

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