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Thread: Need help attaching bigger picture frame to the wall

  1. #1

    Need help attaching bigger picture frame to the wall

    I want to build a frame (sort of like a picture frame) out of 1x4 weathered boards that's going to be 4x5 ft. The frame (without a back or anything else) will go on a wall to create an area where my kids can hang their pictures, etc. So just four boards put together with most likely a biscuit joiner. The problem I have is that I have no idea how to attach such thing to the wall. I would rather not glue because I do not want it to be permanent. Screwing into the wall would make the screws visible. Any ideas? Looking for something that puts it very close to the wall with a minimum gap.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    North Prairie, WI
    Posts
    189
    I have used these from Rockler (https://www.rockler.com/steel-cleats) to hang some really heavy stuff. I've also used several of the options that show up in the related products links at the bottom of that page. They keep things very close to the wall and hold a tremendous amount of weight when properly installed.

    Scott

  3. #3
    And LeeValley has a similar product to the one Scott mentioned: http://www.leevalley.com/us/hardware...914,50630&ap=1

  4. #4
    Thanks for the recommendation. Do you think a 4x5 ft frame would hold on the steel cleat that's attached to the top only with the side and bottom are just hanging? Wouldn't the weight of the boards be too much for the small area where they are joined together?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    North Prairie, WI
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Mielko View Post
    Wouldn't the weight of the boards be too much for the small area where they are joined together?
    I think that would be more of a question of what joinery you used. It doesn't sound like your frame will be all that heavy, but good joinery will certainly improve the odds of the joints staying tight. You can reinforce weak joints with additional splines, etc. to virtually eliminate the problem. I tend to use a Forstner bit to drill a shallow pocket centered over the joint on the back of my frames and epoxy in a dowel/coin/plug/etc. to reinforce the joint. (If using a dowel, though, make sure the grain runs across the joint and not parallel with it or you really don't gain much.)

    Scott

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Grand Forks, ND
    Posts
    2,155
    Get your joinery figured out first, splines are a good option. We have a very large (and heavy!!) mirror in our hall that is attached with a cleat and stop blocks to insure it doesnt get knocked off and injure someone. If you have kids and its in a busy area I'd suggest this method.
    A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. My desk is a work station.

  7. #7
    I am going to use biscuits with wood glue for the miter joints. I don't really have equipment or knowledge to do anything else.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    335
    You should by OK. When gluing up, apply glue to the miters, let it soak into the end grain for a few minutes, then apply again. To get some pressure across the joints, you can tack on triangular ears on each side with hot melt glue - with these, your clamps can exert pressure at right angles to the joints. After glue up, use a few drops of alcohol (DNA, isopropyl) to get the hot melt glue to release.
    -- Jim

    Mr. Natural sez, "Use the right tool for the job."

  9. #9
    If the design allows, and you decide to use one of the steel french cleat options suggested above, you can put one on the top and one on the bottom if you feel you need extra support. As long as you get the spacing right on the wall and the frame, both cleats will engage and support the frame. This will also prevent the bottom from pulling away from the wall.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    602
    Google Z Clips. They can be found in a total thickness of about 1/4" so you could recess the clip into the back of the frame and when hung on the wall the frame would be flush with it. Still gotta use screws though, and accurate layout.
    Or like these: zclips
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

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