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Thread: How hard is Marquetry?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    Technically, geometric designs are parquetry. This is marquetry:

    https://silaskopf.com/
    Wow! I see why Kopf is considered such an authority on this stuff!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Wow! I see why Kopf is considered such an authority on this stuff!
    A good marquetarian has not insubstantial artistic skills. You can go pretty far with parquetry with basic drafting/layout skills.
    Last edited by Charles Guest; 08-19-2019 at 8:35 AM.

  3. #18
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    Geometric inlays can be made with as little as a sharp marking knife and a couple drawing tools like rules compass and triangles.

    I have done some non geometric inlays as well with a fret saw, basically the same as using a scroll saw just slower. I think it is something anyone can learn to do. I am by no means a sketch artist but I certainly can duplicate using a picture as a template.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #19
    Andrew, good point about starting with geometric straight lines , and the compass rose is always ...a star. The book of
    Chinese lattice designs would be a good design source too. Great chair. Has a dignity and specialness that children
    love.

  5. #20
    Charles, thanks for correction. Years ago I did know the difference. Think it fell off the chart when they stopped PARKAY
    margerine commercials.

  6. #21
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    Am I missing something here? I got "The Marquetry Course" from the library and it doesn't seem to teach double bevel. It does teach the window method. The Paul Schurch website no longer sells any videos or anything online. What style of marquetry does he do? Part 1 of his video is on youtube, but it's just an introduction.

    I learned double bevel in a weekend class and I'm trying to finish my project there, but I wouldn't mind some other resources for ideas and practice in that style. What style of marquetry are you guys using out there and is there a reason why you picked one kind over another? I've tried to understand the pro/cons of various styles, but it's a little challenging. In the UK they seem to favor thin veneers and knives (that seems a bit tedious but it produces amazing results). I learned from Matthew Werner who like David J Marks use double bevel -- they both are in the Northern California region. Is it regional or whom you learned from? One of my favorite artists Kagen Sound also uses double bevel, so I'm thinking, maybe I should just keep on this path, but I'm wondering why you chose the style you use (whoever is willing to tell me).

  7. #22
    I highly recommend the Silas Kopf book mentioned above. He is probably most known for his double bevel work although he trained (at Ecole Boule") under Pierre Ramond in Boule and piece by piece as well. His book covers technique in a variety of methods. . The "Marquetry Course" book is by a couple of Brits, and the British seem to favor knife work. Pierre Ramond's book is considered to be a foundation piece in technique.

    It seems that every marquetarian has their own approach, technique, and method of work. I think it is useful to try several and figure out what resonates with you and in what circumstances you might do something different. Our guild seems to favor double bevel work, although there are a couple of members who do knife work pretty much exclusively. Even within double bevel work, there are different methods of work. Most of our guild member lay pieces into the overall composition. James Macdonald taught me to start with assembling the work by joining pieces together and minimizing the laying in. Both work. There are advantages to both -- it depends on the piece what the best course of action is.

    I tried to attach a list of books on marquetry and veneering with notes on them by members of our guild but the file is too large for the forum. If someone wants a copy, send me a private message and I'll pass it along.

    Mike

  8. #23
    Hi all,

    I've found double-bevel marquetry to be a pretty straight-forward magic trick--seems amazing but not that hard once the curtain is pulled away. The Kopf book is a remarkable survey and has a good section on double-bevel techniques, though I found the Craig Vandal Stevens book to be a fabulous step-by-step guide with many tricks that demystify the process (though I don't remember it being quite as much as it is now!):

    https://www.amazon.com/Craig-Vandall.../dp/B01FMW1GM6

    Hope that helps,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  9. #24
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    [QUOTE=Jen Joy;2947275]Am I missing something here? I got "The Marquetry Course" from the library and it doesn't seem to teach double bevel. It does teach the window method. The Paul Schurch website no longer sells any videos or anything online. What style of marquetry does he do? Part 1 of his video is on youtube, but it's just an introduction.

    I learned double bevel in a weekend class and I'm trying to finish my project there, but I wouldn't mind some other resources for ideas and practice in that style. What style of marquetry are you guys using out there and is there a reason why you picked one kind over another? ...



    Hi Jen,

    I'm sensitive to the implied confusion/frustration in your question. Sounds to me like experience I've had many time - "I'm interested in learning this skill, but don't really know where to start".

    Knife vs. double bevel is very fair fundamental question that regretably I can't answer (although I'm also interested in why someone choose one over another). Pic is recent project done using double bevel sawing method w/ fret saw /bird's mouth. Given the small diameter curves, I don't know how that could be done with a knife? I'm sure there is probably a way to do it - I just know I couldn't.

    Best, Mike




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  10. #25
    Wow! This thread is becoming a real jewell of information!
    Thanks everyone!
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

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