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Thread: Shoulder plane advice

  1. #1
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    Shoulder plane advice

    I have a Stanley 92 that I've used for several years, but it's getting harder to use due to my hands getting worse. It was never that comfortable to use (IMHO) in the first place - just never really fit into my hand. I'm thinking about the Veritas Medium shoulder plane. If that adjustable knob actually works like they say - fits into the web of your hand between the thumb and the finger - then that might help. Anyone have one? Comments on it?

    Any other suggestions? I like the HNT Gordon 3/4 shoulder plane as well. It appears from the pics that the Gordon has a typical wedge adjustment arrangement. Is that right?

    I just started 4 dining chairs so I have a butt load of tenons to plane, so all comments and suggestions are welcomed.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  2. #2
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    I have the LN size medium, that bronze rooster tail of a handle does fine for my arthritic joints, but i can't compare it to any of the others. A2 blade, well built, I don't use it a lot, but when I reach for it it does what I ask.

    What about some kind of slick instead? Could you maybe start with a 2" antique chisel, heat it up to bend the handle away from the back of the blade and then use whatever size round you need for a comfortable grip to get your tenons out?

  3. #3
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    Drop me a PM... I've spare wood body shoulder planes I could lend. FYI - the Veritas are excellent, but heavy.

    I found them reliable when "upright" but ended up with sloping tenon's, if used "sideways".

  4. #4
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    Love it. I know some folks say holding it is like holding spaghetti but, I disagree.

    LV-Med-Shoulder-Grip-001.jpgLV-Med-Shoulder-Grip-002.jpg

    Confident, controllable grip. Many variations are possible.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 08-10-2019 at 7:58 PM.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2017
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    Bill, I have the Lie-Nielsen large shoulder plane, but it can be uncomfortable to use repeatedly. Are you planning on using the shoulder plane for the tenon shoulders or the cheeks? A router plane is very nice for adjusting the cheeks.

  6. #6
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    I have a Stanley 92 that I've used for several years, but it's getting harder to use due to my hands getting worse.
    Have you tried using a chisel to trim your tenons and shoulders?

    One of my reasons for preferring socket chisels is how easy it is to make my own handles.

    New Handles.jpg

    This allows making them so the are comfortable in my hand that has had a few injuries over the years and suffers some from arthritis.

    This style of handle is easy to handle with a few different grips. The 'ball' top is comfortable to push with the palm of the hand. The ring near the socket allows it to be held between a couple of fingers with the hand wrapped around it for tapping with a mallet. The ring also is a good stop for the web between the thumb and forefinger when paring.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Carey View Post
    I have a Stanley 92 that I've used for several years, but it's getting harder to use due to my hands getting worse. It was never that comfortable to use (IMHO) in the first place - just never really fit into my hand. I'm thinking about the Veritas Medium shoulder plane. If that adjustable knob actually works like they say - fits into the web of your hand between the thumb and the finger - then that might help. Anyone have one? Comments on it?

    Any other suggestions? I like the HNT Gordon 3/4 shoulder plane as well. It appears from the pics that the Gordon has a typical wedge adjustment arrangement. Is that right?

    I just started 4 dining chairs so I have a butt load of tenons to plane, so all comments and suggestions are welcomed.
    Bill, I reviewed the Veritas Medium in 2006, and compared it with both the Stanley 92 and HNT Gordon 3/4” planes you mention.

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRev...r%20Plane.html

    In the end, I kept the Veritas and sold the Stanley and HNT Gordon.

    Ironically, I tend not to use a shoulder plane for shoulders - I prefer a chisel. Occasionally a shoulder plane does get used for shoulders, but mainly I use one for tuning rebates, at which it excels. My favourite is the Veritas Small, which is 1/2”.

    I reviewed the Small in 2010: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRev...lderPlane.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  8. #8
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    I have the Veritas medium shoulder plane with the knob and love it. I have hand and wrist problems and the knob works great.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the comments gents.
    I use the Stanley for both the cheeks and the shoulders. And I think I'll try a chisel on the cheeks tomorrow. I'm going to order the Veritas Medium and try that for a while. Appreciate the info from you guys that use it.
    Thanks for the offer of lending me a plane, Jim, but I could never get the hang of adjusting wooden planes. I guess it's all the years I spent as a framing carpenter. Put a hammer in my hand I hit things too hard.
    Nice review Derek - thanks for pointing me to it. Helped seal the deal.
    And Larry - hand and wrist problems and you love it? Say no more. Expect to see a Stanley 92 for sale soon.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  10. #10
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    I think I'll try a chisel on the cheeks tomorrow.
    Just a hint, use a chisel that is about as wide as the tenon is long if you have one.

    Here is a project of mine with 24 mortise and tenons:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?262272

    The ninth post shows trimming cheeks and shoulders with a chisel.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
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    For small tenons, the Iwasaki wood files work great at fine tuning. I bought Record large, and small shoulder planes back when they were still available new, but as much as they've been used, I don't remember either ever touching a tenon, or shoulder.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Carey View Post
    Thanks for the comments gents.
    I use the Stanley for both the cheeks and the shoulders. And I think I'll try a chisel on the cheeks tomorrow. I'm going to order the Veritas Medium and try that for a while. Appreciate the info from you guys that use it.
    Thanks for the offer of lending me a plane, Jim, but I could never get the hang of adjusting wooden planes. I guess it's all the years I spent as a framing carpenter. Put a hammer in my hand I hit things too hard.
    Nice review Derek - thanks for pointing me to it. Helped seal the deal.
    And Larry - hand and wrist problems and you love it? Say no more. Expect to see a Stanley 92 for sale soon.
    i have the LV medium and I think you’ll be pleased.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Hoodsport
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    I bought the Veritas large shoulder plane; and if anything, it's too large and heavy. I think your right in looking at the medium. I also found a good, sharp router plane does very good trimming cheeks.
    Where did I put those band aids?

  14. #14
    Before you order the Medium shoulder plane, consider their large router plane. For cheeks, it find it (slower but) easier than a shoulder plane. I share your thoughts about fatigue.

    Then you just have to use a chisel on the shoulders (great if you like to undercut them anyway).

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    I have the LV medium and large shoulder planes. I am happy with both planes.

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