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Thread: Vacuum Fence for Slider

  1. #16
    John, great post, thx for sharing, love innovation like this!

    a few questions.

    I too am contemplating how to cut veneers...
    I always assumed the kerf loss of a TS blade would create to much waste for cutting veneers??
    What diam blade in your Slider? What is max. height u can cut?

    I considered a slider with a wide diam blade, 16", instead of a bandsaw for re sawing. Any input would be much appreciated.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    49,184
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Blick View Post
    I considered a slider with a wide diam blade, 16", instead of a bandsaw for re sawing. Any input would be much appreciated.
    By the time you consider the portion of the blade that will always be below the table, your re-saw height would not likely be more than about 6.5" or so with the 16" blade. Not really an ideal situation for re-sawing, IMHO. My slider has a 12" blade and my max blade exposure is about 4.5" or so.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    I was thinking it was 7" cut depth for 16"....
    so, maybe its less as u suggest..
    then u turn the wood 180 deg for a second pass
    so, 12-14" total cut height.
    If u are not overly concerned about kerf waste, (min. use, low cost woods, etc) seems feasible

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Blick View Post
    If u are not overly concerned about kerf waste, (min. use, low cost woods, etc) seems feasible
    Will, I think Joe is using a "diamond" blade with 2mm kerf:
    https://www.woodworkingnetwork.com/w...259385541.html

    Still about double what a bandsaw blade would be, but not 1/8"...

  5. #20
    Thx Dan....
    interesting blade!
    wow, 75% noise reduction for that blade?
    for real? wow, noise is an issue for me...
    2mm is impressive, if cuts are clean enough, and u save on cleaning up BS marks...
    the difference in loss even less.

  6. #21
    $500

    (seriously)

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Woodstock, VA
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    774
    Really nice work John! And an interesting set up. I would imagine it's really easy to position the work and just hit the air switch?
    If you wanted to make a video of the process I wouldn't complain one bit! 😁

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    49,184
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Blick View Post
    I was thinking it was 7" cut depth for 16"....
    so, maybe its less as u suggest..
    then u turn the wood 180 deg for a second pass
    so, 12-14" total cut height.
    If u are not overly concerned about kerf waste, (min. use, low cost woods, etc) seems feasible
    Really depends upon the arbor size including the nut and how far up the blade can be raised without interference by the machine top. For veneer work, it may be difficult/undesirable to "flip" because the thin off-cut IS going to move.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Flower mound, Tx
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    471
    Hey guys, again thank you for your compliments. One of my favorite things is to create jigs or fixtures that make “production” woodworking faster, more accurate, and more enjoyable.
    -As far as cutting veneer, I make all my veneer at the bandsaw and the widw-belt. I have only used the slider to cut veneer laying flat.
    -As far as the diamond blade, I have only used it for particular tasks. The performance is amazing and yes, very quiet. But time will tell if it lasts as long as it is touted to.... 20 times longer?
    -I do have a video but Ill need to post in on YouTube first I guesss?
    -I do think this setup weather it is vertical or horizontal is such a game changer for production work. Consider routing mortises for quadrant hinges. Each hinge requires 4 separate routing setups. That’s 8 steps per box not to mention the drilling for the screws. So, I found the clamping jig hugely beneficial for operations like this. Routing inlay borders too. Just a flick of the air switch, reposition, hit the switch again and your off to the races. Also, no clamping dents to wory about.

    Here are a few more pics:

    AB1B6D07-4C8D-425B-AF95-7D08C9787B0B.jpgE5E16AE0-B8B8-4767-AFB0-CBD3F4BADDF2.jpg5D1B44F7-5B46-4403-98AB-59221D58B9C6.jpgFC8E5D75-B133-4F64-AE53-52C654BF9B8D.jpgD4F2C43A-71B6-4102-9AED-EA3CFC3B7823.jpg

  10. #25
    Great pix John!!
    One of my frustrations with ww is
    I dont do production of anything, and always think throughout the long procesess of mortising, etc, If only I had a jig, this would go fast... of course, making the jig would take me 6x longer than doing the one off..... u sure do things the right and efficient way, Kudos...
    btw, do you sell your gorgeous boxes? what outlet do you use? Pinterest?

    Jim, very valid point.... the cut side will flex after a flip, prob. causing underiable outcomes.

    Now, back to the blade... a TS blade that makes hardly any noise...hmmmm... definetly will look into this... yes, the price is a shocker, specially considering I have sooo many un opened blades already.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Flower mound, Tx
    Posts
    471
    Thanks Will,
    Definitely a little frustrating making jigs, fixtures, and templates to achieve the overall project. Like clamps, we can never have enough jigs��. I guess the modern woodworker spends the same amount of prep time only he/she has to program the CNC?
    - I sell all my work through a single company in Hawaii that has 16 galleries in all the Islands and Las Vegas.

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