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Thread: I'ts official, I am a tool junkie

  1. #1
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    I'ts official, I am a tool junkie

    My neighbor was cleaning out her garage and gave me an entire US Mail tote filled with old tools from her grandfather and dad. She was going to set it out for the trash. I was stupid enough to take it. This is just the stuff I kept NONE OF WHICH I NEED!!! I tossed just as much. I kept at least 20 small c-clamps. I mean, who has too many clamps, right? I tossed twist drills for a brace, a lot of old collets, goofy shaped wrenches. Hello everyone, I am Ole, a tool junkie...
    Linda tools.jpg
    NOW you tell me...

  2. #2
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    Our kids will be tossing out boxes of that kind of stuff when we die. Your kids will probably toss out or give away that exact stuff to some other poor sucker!

  3. #3
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    Ole if it makes you feel any better I would probably have PAID for that pile.

  4. #4
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    Nice score - plenty of "wall hangers" in that pile.

    You aren't really hard core though until you have at least a dozen tools that you have no idea what they do or how to use them....
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  5. #5
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    You never know when you'll find a real "gem" in a box of stuff that was tossed and needs to be tossed. No harm in culling out what catches your fancy! And yea...clamps are always welcome, even if you only use a particular type once in a blue moon.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    The photo reminded me of just how small a tool collection can look when it's compressed into a box or pile. When we cleaned out my dads tools they all fit in a couple of paper boxes. And he had accomplished a lot with those things. He was a dentist and built all his own cabinetry. He was way ahead of his time in designing a rolling cabinet that had the vacuum, air, water drills and stuff right at hand. This was back in the day that they had these cast iron things bolted to the floor.

    My grandfather was an upholsterer, metal worker, woodworker, and blacksmith. After he died, my grandmother wanted to get rid of his tools. My dad really wanted all that stuff (industrial sewing machines, you name it) but grandma was too proud to take money from a relative. So my dad had to load up all those tools, filling our 4'x8' utility trailer so we are talking about between 64 and 96 cubic feet of tools. He drove them across town to the buyer and collected the $50 selling price she had agreed to. To add insult to injury, the guys dog bit my dad.

  7. #7
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    My biggest fear is that, if I die first, my wife will sell all my high end power tools for next to nothing or give them away not realizing their value. I wouldn't care if they were given to a young woodworker who is just beginning because that would be an appropriate place for them to end up.

  8. #8
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    Further culled that pile and the stuff in his old machinists Pilliod tool box. This is what I want to get rid of. Worth putting it up on the classifieds? Only thing of any real value is a Browne & Sharp thread gauge micrometer in a Starret box and a Starret bore gauge. Worth doing a detail listing? All or nothing, not going to part it out. This thread had some closeups of a few of the tools. https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ist-s-tool-box Probably $20 just to ship.

    machinist tools.jpg
    NOW you tell me...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    Further culled that pile and the stuff in his old machinists Pilliod tool box. This is what I want to get rid of. Worth putting it up on the classifieds? Only thing of any real value is a Browne & Sharp thread gauge micrometer in a Starret box and a Starret bore gauge. Worth doing a detail listing? All or nothing, not going to part it out. This thread had some closeups of a few of the tools. https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ist-s-tool-box Probably $20 just to ship.

    machinist tools.jpg
    Someone will happily take those off your hands. I would take it for the cost of shipping without a second thought

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    Worth putting it up on the classifieds?
    Yes, and that's the only place that selling is permitted. Another forum Contributor recently sold a number of lots of tools quite successfully.

    Jim
    Forum Moderator

  11. #11
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    Feb 2010
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    I've had a couple of these types of scores fall in my lap over the years and have found a couple ways to pay appropriate tribute to the previous owner:

    1 - My kids (young teenagers presently) have a pretty decent set of hand tools thanks to great grandpa (RIP), the Army veteran neighbor (RIP), and a couple other hard-to-remember scenarios

    2 - I have some cool old timey stuff hanging as decorations in my shop and rec room. A vintage #2 school bell was in one score, and now mounted outside the barn where we ring it on the 4th of July each year.

    3 - outfitting specialized-purpose toolboxes for my own use... e.g. I have a toolbox for simple tasks in the house (tightening a handle, installing a picture etc.) with all the basic needs covered. I also have a toolbox just for electrical work and another just for plumbing work. Most of the tools in all three of these were provided by recycling another man's tools.


    As for when we pass (hopefully longgggggggggg from now! and hopefully survived by all our loved ones).... I have a spreadsheet that details the equipment I have, what I paid, and what I'd expect a used-sale to fetch. We also did a walk through video diary for insurance reasons (and so my wife could use it someday if needed). Importantly, my wife and kids both know how to access these tools.

    (edit: the spreadsheet and video mostly focuses on the big/important/expensive equipment... but does give some general buckets too)
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  12. #12
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    Apr 2018
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    My father was a tool junkie too. And not the good kind like me. He would drive to Florida monthly and go to the flea markets and buy the cheapest stuff you've ever seen. Most of it never was used (or even taken out of the box. My famous example was a twist bit drill index. He bought out the entire stock. The first time I used one of the bits to drill aluminum the bit got a good bite of the aluminum and untwisted itself then twisted in the reverse direction. But they were something like a buck apiece. When he passed away I took buckets full of that stuff straight to the dump. I remember people staring at me because I was putting 4 brand new corded drills int he free section (some off beat Chinese brand that were just dying to let the smoke out of the first time they were plugged in). I still saved too much and need to continue throw it out. I have a full set of diving gear (I know not woodworking or tool related) that he might of used in a swimming pool once. The tank hasn't been hydro tested since 93 but still has air in it. What do you do with something like that other than free on Craig's list.

    At least when I die it's not going to be 100s of lbs, it'll be tons of tools, lol, that someone other than me has to get rid of.

  13. #13
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    Jan 2016
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    Longmont, CO
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    you may end up with a bidding war over that haul... many of us would be interested in that lot.

  14. #14
    The surface gauges are handy for transferring precise layouts. I used one to put sun dial lines I'd drawn on paper ,to the
    pattern material. One of those things you need ,but maybe don't know it.

  15. #15
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    Oct 2018
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    New Boston, Michigan
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    If I start fading they will be circling my street with their trucks and flatbeds.
    Ask a woodworker to "make your bed" and he/she makes a bed.

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