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Thread: Light/Lamp

  1. #1

    Light/Lamp

    Am looking at lights/lamps to use with my full size lathe. Any recommendations?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    Lake Burton, Northeast Georgia
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    110
    Woodturnerswonders.com (Ken Rizza) has several lamps which combine bright LED lights and magnet-switches (the magnet used to secure lamp to lathe is "switchable," off when you need to move it, on when you have it in the right place.) Good bendable goose-neck, to put the light where it's needed. Fair price, good service. I have had a "Beacon" model for several years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Marshall View Post
    Woodturnerswonders.com (Ken Rizza) has several lamps which combine bright LED lights and magnet-switches (the magnet used to secure lamp to lathe is "switchable," off when you need to move it, on when you have it in the right place.) Good bendable goose-neck, to put the light where it's needed. Fair price, good service. I have had a "Beacon" model for several years.
    I agree - I use a bunch of his lights. My favorite is the Supernova, I keep one at each lathe, sharpening station, bandsaw, drill press, milling machine, for photography, and a spare to carry to demos. Very bright, even light, great color temperature.

    JKJ

  4. #4
    Great feedback guys; was looking at these. You confirmed it for me. Thanks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Haubstadt (Evansville), Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I agree - I use a bunch of his lights. My favorite is the Supernova, I keep one at each lathe, sharpening station, bandsaw, drill press, milling machine, for photography, and a spare to carry to demos. Very bright, even light, great color temperature.

    JKJ

    John

    Just wondering if you get the club discount?
    When working I had more money than time. In retirement I have more time than money. Love the time, miss the money.

  6. #6
    I have a couple of the 9watt magnetic machine lights from the big A, and am happy with them, if you are looking for a lower cost option. Rather similar in appearance....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    sykesville, maryland
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I agree - I use a bunch of his lights. My favorite is the Supernova, I keep one at each lathe, sharpening station, bandsaw, drill press, milling machine, for photography, and a spare to carry to demos. Very bright, even light, great color temperature.

    JKJ
    second the supernova. I only have one, but more are on my wish list when I can afford them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland
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    2,629
    I too have a supernova and really like it but at times depending what I'm doing it can actually be too bright and I use a shop modified Ikea LED desk lamp. So you probably need more than one light.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    160
    check out the sewing machine lights on Amazon. Inexpensive and light is great. Get the longer one

  10. #10
    All great input and each light recommended is great in the right application. Thanks for the responses.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,212
    Quote Originally Posted by William C Rogers View Post
    John
    Just wondering if you get the club discount?
    Rizza has occasionally put them on sale and that's when I buy.

    JKJ

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Light color and light spread

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Domina View Post
    All great input and each light recommended is great in the right application. Thanks for the responses.
    I have a handful of various sewing machine type lights, several from Amazon and several from Rizza. One thing to keep in mind is the light output.

    In this photo I aimed two lights at the wall behind my sharping station. At the far left is one of Rizza's Supernova lights. Towards the right is one of the brighter sewing machine type lights, sticking straight up just in front of the electrical outlet. You can see the brightness difference.

    Lights_SN_sewing.jpg

    In my experience the length of the light and the number of LEDs does not correspond directly to the brightness. For example, I have one of Rizza's earlier Galaxy lamps (sewing machine type) and one of his newer Galaxys with more LEDs. My light meter shows the earlier one, shorter and with fewer LEDs, is actually brighter than the longer one.

    Note that the sewing machine lights do spread the light more, making the output at one point look even dimmer than the lumen value (the total output of a lighting element). The light from the Supernova is more focused with less spread. John Lucas made a slip-on diffuser for his Supernova to spread the light a little more. I use multiple lamps at the lathe so I like the undiffused light better there.

    Another thing to keep in mind is with lamps the color temperature of the LEDs. For example, the light from Rizza's Supernova is perfect in my opinion - I use one for highlights when I shoot photos and the color temperature is not detectably different from that of my two photo bulbs. However, at a symposium my quick side comparison of the Supernova with his newer Quasar ("Our best lamp ever") shows a distinct color difference - the light from the Quasar had a distinct yellowish cast on a piece of white paper. If the color doesn't bother you, the Quasar does have on advantages - the switch. The switch on the Supernova is on the side and it's easy to accidentally turn it off while grabbing the lamp to reposition it. The switch on the Quasar is on the end and unlikely to be touched accidentally. Fortunately, accidentally turning off the Supernova is no more than an insignificant irritation.

    JKJ

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Haubstadt (Evansville), Indiana
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    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I have a handful of various sewing machine type lights, several from Amazon and several from Rizza. One thing to keep in mind is the light output.

    In this photo I aimed two lights at the wall behind my sharping station. At the far left is one of Rizza's Supernova lights. Towards the right is one of the brighter sewing machine type lights, sticking straight up just in front of the electrical outlet. You can see the brightness difference.

    Lights_SN_sewing.jpg

    In my experience the length of the light and the number of LEDs does not correspond directly to the brightness. For example, I have one of Rizza's earlier Galaxy lamps (sewing machine type) and one of his newer Galaxys with more LEDs. My light meter shows the earlier one, shorter and with fewer LEDs, is actually brighter than the longer one.

    Note that the sewing machine lights do spread the light more, making the output at one point look even dimmer than the lumen value (the total output of a lighting element). The light from the Supernova is more focused with less spread. John Lucas made a slip-on diffuser for his Supernova to spread the light a little more. I use multiple lamps at the lathe so I like the undiffused light better there.

    Another thing to keep in mind is with lamps the color temperature of the LEDs. For example, the light from Rizza's Supernova is perfect in my opinion - I use one for highlights when I shoot photos and the color temperature is not detectably different from that of my two photo bulbs. However, at a symposium my quick side comparison of the Supernova with his newer Quasar ("Our best lamp ever") shows a distinct color difference - the light from the Quasar had a distinct yellowish cast on a piece of white paper. If the color doesn't bother you, the Quasar does have on advantages - the switch. The switch on the Supernova is on the side and it's easy to accidentally turn it off while grabbing the lamp to reposition it. The switch on the Quasar is on the end and unlikely to be touched accidentally. Fortunately, accidentally turning off the Supernova is no more than an insignificant irritation.

    JKJ
    John, great “show and tell” as they say a picture is worth a thousand words.
    When working I had more money than time. In retirement I have more time than money. Love the time, miss the money.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,212
    Quote Originally Posted by William C Rogers View Post
    ... as they say a picture is worth a thousand words.
    A friend once turned that around and declared a word was then worth a mili-picture.

  15. #15
    I love the light from Ken however sometimes the magnet slips when I move the light. I have to steady the magnet and then move the light. Anyone else have this issue? I should add the magnet is attached to a Robust lathe which is powder coated. Would that make a difference?

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