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Thread: Bandsaw Tire Repair

  1. #1

    Bandsaw Tire Repair

    While prepping a green bowl blank on the bandsaw, the blade got stuck as the wheels were spinning. The result was the formation of a ridge in the bandsaw tires. The saw continues to run fine with the current blade but my concern is when I put a wider blade on, it won't sit correctly on the tires due to the ridge. Has anyone ever had this issue, and were you able to smooth/salvage the tires? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    If smoothing does not work, you can always replace. Try one and if it does not work, replace the tires.
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 08-05-2019 at 1:28 PM.

  3. #3
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    You can sand the tire down if rubber, not sure about urethane. Just make sure you keep it round without bumps. Google something like crowning bandsaw tires.

  4. #4
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    angle grinder? I think sandpaper wood load up too fast.
    Bill D.

  5. #5
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    Sandpaper works fine on rubber. 80-100 grit.
    I take it youíve never crowned a bandsaw wheel.

  6. #6
    Thanks for the replies.

    Matt - I've never had this event occur before, so I haven't had occasion to crown a wheel.

  7. #7
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    Edward, I was referring to Billís comment about sandpaper loading up. In fact it just makes a huge mess with black dust all over the place.

  8. #8
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    I think it would be risky to attempt to smooth out the tires. If it were me, I'd replace the damaged tires (after a day or two of frustration for having to replace them).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    Edward, I was referring to Billís comment about sandpaper loading up. In fact it just makes a huge mess with black dust all over the place.
    Got it Matt.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weingarden View Post
    Got it Matt.
    No, I have never done much with abrading rubber. No offense taken. Learn something new everyday.
    Now that I think more abut it they use rubber sticks to clean sandpaper belts.
    Bill D.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 08-06-2019 at 9:50 AM.

  11. #11
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    I would replace the tires. The tires are damaged and are likely to get worse and throw and ruin a blade.

  12. #12
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    Are both tires damaged? You can easily work the bottom one under power and I have learned after much experimentation to use a rasp. The top wheel, I mounted on a lathe to get a concentric surface. Sand paper did not last very long when I used it.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  13. #13
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    They resurface rubber pressure rollers on $40K widebelt sanders by running them over sandpaper. Pretty hard to mess up, just spin the wheels by hand so there isn't too much heat buildup. Good luck.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by David Utterback View Post
    Are both tires damaged? You can easily work the bottom one under power and I have learned after much experimentation to use a rasp. The top wheel, I mounted on a lathe to get a concentric surface. Sand paper did not last very long when I used it.
    David - both tires have a ridge. I'll give it go trying to smooth them, but I suspect I'll need to invest in a new pair.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weingarden View Post
    David - both tires have a ridge. I'll give it go trying to smooth them, but I suspect I'll need to invest in a new pair.
    If the damage was done by the blade stopping/slowing while the bottom wheel was spinning at normal speed, the damage should appear only on the bottom wheel. Since both wheels are showing the same ridge, chances are the tires reached this point together due to age in service.

    Remember, the blade turns the top wheel. If the blade slows so does the top wheel. So there should have been no slippage between the blade and the top wheel when that event happened.

    Might be time to replace them soon, even if you are successful at dressing them to remove that ridge.
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

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