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Thread: electrical setup for auto on Dust collector when blast gate opened?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    electrical setup for auto on Dust collector when blast gate opened?

    My electrician is finishing up his wiring of the new shop this week. All new construction, so no walls in yet, but will be soon. I meticulously laid out the wiring based on tons of input from y'all, hig and low outlets, separate kill switch controlling all outlets..so don't feel quite so in the dark here. But I have a quick question-

    1. I am hoping to setup machines with a DC auto on feature when blast gate is opened. I haven't gotten to the design of the gates yet, or even specifics of what I'm using, got busy at work and the contractor started earlier than planned, so just a tad behind a few details like this. I currently have the heavy metal blast gates from Oneida with a 2HP commercial cyclone. My immediate question, is do I need to have any kind of specialized wiring run to each outlet from the DC in order to utilize the auto on feature? If so, what, or can should I instead use some kind of dependable wireless gate eliminating that need, and if so, what?? Want to get my electrician to do what that might require before we close up the walls end of week. Thanks so much!!

  2. #2
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    Not sure about a DC auto when the gate is opened, but have seen auto DC & auto gate when the machine is turned on.
    You might check out the iVac system here
    It's never too late to have a happy childhood.

  3. #3
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    I've read about various setups with microswitches on the gates, but also read about them not working very well. I used a wireless system for a long time but found it to be a pain-- one day after pushing the button about ten times holding the remote in all possible orientations to the antenna that was about six feet away I said to heck with it and wired up a set of remote switches connected to a contactor at the DC. In my 36x36 shop I dropped four switches close to the machines that I use most often and have been very happy with that setup. I never have to take more than one or two steps to hit one of the switches and it works right every single time.

    I used a 120V control circuit (the DC is 240 V) just because I didn't happen to have a transformer to drop it to 24 or some other suitable low voltage and also had a spare reel of 14-2 wire that I wasn't likely to ever use up for anything else. The contactor came from McMaster and a box to house it was acquired cheap on ebay. Using regular four-way light switches the system can be turned on or off from any location. It's a lot less fussy, low tech solution than trying to rig something up to work with either the machines or blast gates.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Schoenthal View Post
    Not sure about a DC auto when the gate is opened, but have seen auto DC & auto gate when the machine is turned on.
    You might check out the iVac system here
    Thanks Chris! Would love to hear from anyone that has used these. A bit pricey but sure looks nice if they're dependable and work consistently first and every time.
    Last edited by Dave Burson; 08-04-2019 at 3:33 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    I've read about various setups with microswitches on the gates, but also read about them not working very well. I used a wireless system for a long time but found it to be a pain-- one day after pushing the button about ten times holding the remote in all possible orientations to the antenna that was about six feet away I said to heck with it and wired up a set of remote switches connected to a contactor at the DC. In my 36x36 shop I dropped four switches close to the machines that I use most often and have been very happy with that setup. I never have to take more than one or two steps to hit one of the switches and it works right every single time.

    I used a 120V control circuit (the DC is 240 V) just because I didn't happen to have a transformer to drop it to 24 or some other suitable low voltage and also had a spare reel of 14-2 wire that I wasn't likely to ever use up for anything else. The contactor came from McMaster and a box to house it was acquired cheap on ebay. Using regular four-way light switches the system can be turned on or off from any location. It's a lot less fussy, low tech solution than trying to rig something up to work with either the machines or blast gates.
    Roger,
    That sounds like a pretty good idea there! I need to talk to electrician tomorrow about setting this up, which would be easy to do before I get the drywall in. Thanks so much!

  6. #6
    Aug 2000, Fine Woodworking had an article on using a sensor mounted in the panel box. When a circuit is energized, DC comes on, and turns off the same way. I added a run on break relay to mine to allow DC to run for an additional 10 seconds to clear the pipes. With this system, I never have to fiddle with a remote, it's automatic.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Lancaster, Ohio
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    I use Hawkeye current sensing relays to monitor power usage from all machines with dust collection. This then triggers a relay that energises a contactor to power the dust collector.
    I have since added a wall switch in parallel with the Hawkeyes to turn the DC on, as I don't like the DC turning on and off as I move from table saw to radial arm saw to jointer. Way too many S/S, yet still have the DC turn on automatically when doing occasional machining.

    So if you are still reading have your electrician run 18/2(or whatever he has handy) from every blast gate and at least one switch box to the contactor you are using to S/S the DC.
    This will cover whatever you decide to install. Also highly recommend your air compressor has a contactor tied into light circuit so when lights are off air compressor can't run.

    Can get you part numbers and sources in a couple of days, grandkids are here now and my time is very limited now

  8. #8
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    I would run line from each gate to the dc. Any small gauge wire is fine. Probably run 24 volts control. #16 is fine. Irrigation wire is probably cheapest and easy to find. I have a box of fire alarm wire that I use for such things. You only need two or maybe three conductors.
    I would do all the wire as homerun, no daisy chaining
    Bill D.

  9. #9
    I thought about doing that - auto on when opening a blast gate - but my dust collector has a remote control which is easy to use so I went with that. Much simpler. I open the blast gate and touch the button on the remote - done.

    Do the reverse to turn off.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  10. #10
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    As long as the remote has a battery with enough energy to do the work...... I've a lone ranger and while it works, I too stand hitting button 10 times.... Then I have to go buy a new 9v battery.
    And I put it down and have to walk across the room. Or I clip it on my pants and it is then inside the house at end of the day. And I forget to take it back out next morning....
    Walking around to get the remote..... I'm tired of it too. Wire up switch/switches
    Yeah, helps sometimes, but a switched system is WAY better. 5 or 10 steps each way vs walking across the shop twice. And stupid dead battery....
    Woodworking, Old Tools and Shooting
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  11. #11
    I control my Dust Collector with a micro-switch installed on each gate. The micro-switches are wired in parallel with each other, and that connection is wired in series with a small DC transformer which is connected to the input side of a solid state relay. So when any gate is "Opened" for use, the relay is energized and feeds 240V output to the dust collector which turns on. So in total, the electronics required is a standard DC transformer (a wall wart style) and a solid state relay (DC In, AC Out).

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Burson View Post
    Thanks Chris! Would love to hear from anyone that has used these. A bit pricey but sure looks nice if they're dependable and work consistently first and every time.
    I wanted the same thing a automated blast gate that is open when ever I turn on a piece of equipment,
    I looked at the Ivac it was out of my grade so I built mine using a Arduino Micro Controller, I have AC Hall effect seniors that at monitor the current flow on a tool when it is turned on that then sends a signal to activate a servo motor that opens the blast gate of the tool that was turned on a closes all other gates. I am using 5 inch blast gates and the Ivac system I saw were all 4 inch and pricy. Excluding the cost of the blast gates I have built my system for less than $100.00
    Last edited by Lane Hardy; 09-12-2019 at 3:16 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Burson View Post
    Thanks Chris! Would love to hear from anyone that has used these. A bit pricey but sure looks nice if they're dependable and work consistently first and every time.
    I don't have the auto iVac blast gates, but I do use the iVac Tool Plus sensors to start up and shut off my DC unit. My blast gates are only about 20 feet apart, so it only takes a few seconds to walk over and close/open them manually, plus there are times when i use a 2.5" and a 4" hose at the same time, i.e. when I'm using my router table.

    I have the IVac Tool Plus sensors, some mounted on the power cable for a specific tool and others on extension cords.

    I've been using them for 4+ years without issue.

  14. #14
    Here's a couple youtubes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqJ1gggJfO4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kw8CZr5Zh4w

    If you go low voltage, which I what these guys did and what I plan, you don't need wiring in the walls. You can run door bell wire along the ducts. This is what I plan to do.

  15. #15
    I have the following setup and am very happy with it. The sensor and gates work as expected. It was costly but I added it in waves.

    - ClearVue 1800
    - iVac pro switch with contactor
    - 5 iVac pro sensors and iVac blast gates

    Because of the DC size, I needed the pro switch with MRT (Minimum Run Time).

    Two concerns/issues

    - You have to ground the gates, I had one power supply burn out, I could see the spark jumping from a short piece of flex pipe
    - You need outlets! The Pro Sensor needs power (can be USB 5amp), the gate needs power and of course the tool needs power.
    - The only issue I have is using the system with a miter saw. If I reached the MRT and then trigger the saw the DC will shut off after the cut. Other tools you normally leave running (table saw, jointer, planner, etc) so this is not an issue. To get around this I am going to switch the sensor for the Miter Saw to another channel and have it only open the gate. I will turn on the DC with the Remote manually.

    Just my two cents.

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