Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Stopped chamfer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    547

    Stopped chamfer

    On the edge of a long board I want to make a stopped chamfer ( bevel ). Any methods of work recommended using handtools? Are bullnose rabbet planes worth buying?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Stone Mountain, GA
    Posts
    432
    I can't comment on bullnose rabbet planes but you don't need one to do a stopped chamfer. Mark your lines, then use a small bench plane or block plane to remove most of the material, leaving some at either end where the plane can't get to. If you skew the plane heavily you will effectively shorten the length of sole in contact with the work, so you can work closer to the ends. Then use a different tool to work the ends- you can use a convex sole spokeshave, rasp, files, sanding blocks, or gouges.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Newburgh, Indiana
    Posts
    890
    Here's what I do when making stopped cambers. First I make a stop cut with a saw at the same angle as the chamfer. Then I remove most of waste with a draw knife. With care and with the grain you can make a nice looking chamfer with the draw knife alone. If needed I clean things up with a spoke shave. If you don't have a draw knife or spoke shave, visit an antique mall and get one. They are indispensible.

    A nice alternative to a stopped camber is adding a lambs tongue at the end of the camber. It is a nice little detail that finishes the camber without being abrupt.
    Last edited by Bob Glenn; 08-02-2019 at 10:27 AM.
    Life's too short to use old sandpaper.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    547
    Thanks for the good advice guys!

  5. #5
    If it is a small chamfer, I usually just use a block plane to do the chamfer, starting or ending (depending on grain direction) a little short of the end of the chamfer by turning the plane diagonally off the edge. I do the stopped part free hand with a chisel. If it was a bigger chamfer, I'd probably just use a chamfer bit in a router and freehand the stop with a chisel.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    19,823
    Blog Entries
    1
    Here is a page from the user manual for a Stanley #55 showing another way to do stopped chamfers:

    Pg 15 - Stanley #55 Manual.png

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    547
    Good pic Jim! Thanks.

  8. #8
    You can first create the stop using sandpaper wrapped around a dowel (sneak up on it) then chisel a long enough flat to receive the hand plane.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  9. #9
    It takes practice, but I often just use a chisel and a steady hand and careful eye. Wider chisels make it easier; I typically use my 2". You could also just chisel the spot before the stop long enough to accept the nose of whatever plane you are using.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    547
    thanks for the good tips Neanders!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •