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Thread: Aged Heart Pine Yellow?

  1. #1

    Aged Heart Pine Yellow?

    Wondering if there are any suggestions on how to match this yellow/amber color on these pine boards. I've got a few that have become damaged over the years, and I'd like to swap them out. However, I do not know of a way to replicate the current "yellow/amber" hue of these boards.

    I'm also not sure when they were finished, or using what product. Given the lack of abuse, I'm guessing these were redone by the previous owners, but I'm not sure. The house is ~100 years old (1915) and I'm pretty sure they're original to the house.

    I thinking the best approach might be some sort of process to artificially "age" the pine, followed by an oil based poly or lacquer.

    Suggestions?

    IMG_20190801_134600.jpg

  2. #2
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    Up for a small adventure? OK good. I would do the match by putting Transtint dye in Sealcoat shellac, then topcoat with your OB poly. Which Transtint? That's the adventure. Might be Dark Vintage Maple, might be Honey Amber, might be a mix of those plus some others. No way to be completely sure without some experimentation on identically prepared scrap, from start to finish.

    John

  3. #3
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    You have to be careful staining Pine. Too dark, and the softwood absorbs more than the hard grain, and reverses the dark to light. I've had some luck using Minwax Natural, with a touch of Puritan Pine, and one of the other Pines. This is the only job that I use Minwax stains for. You don't want to make it as dark as the old ones, because it will get darker as it ages, stained or not. This will give it a little color, so it won't look so drastically different to start with.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Up for a small adventure? OK good. I would do the match by putting Transtint dye in Sealcoat shellac, then topcoat with your OB poly. Which Transtint? That's the adventure. Might be Dark Vintage Maple, might be Honey Amber, might be a mix of those plus some others. No way to be completely sure without some experimentation on identically prepared scrap, from start to finish.

    John
    Yea, I like this method, too...it's similar to how I recently did a "burst" coloration on a guitar body...using the sealer with dyes to get to the color depth I wanted before moving on to top coats. Yes, the color isn't "in" the wood, but for matching something like this in the here and now, it's a great way to do things. Each coat of the dyed clear adds to that depth so you can start out lighter and with each sprayed (or hand applied if necessary) coat "get there".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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    San Diego area
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    Put them out in the sun for a day or so to make them darken naturally?
    WoodsShop

  6. #6
    @John - Thanks for the suggestion. I've tried matching with just stains on a door I did, the tints sound like a better approach to this.

    @Joe - I've got a piece made of southern yellow pine in the sun and haven't noticed any changes yet. Could be there's some anti-UV in the spar varnish I applied.

  7. #7
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    yeah I've never work the sy pine but it works on wr cedar and redwood which I use, was worth a shot!
    WoodsShop

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    @John - Thanks for the suggestion. I've tried matching with just stains on a door I did, the tints sound like a better approach to this.

    @Joe - I've got a piece made of southern yellow pine in the sun and haven't noticed any changes yet. Could be there's some anti-UV in the spar varnish I applied.

    Most spar varnishes have UV a package to protect the resins from breaking down. Some have an additional chemical to keep the wood from changing color. If yours had the later in it, it would take months/years to notice a color change depending upon the exposure.

    John

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