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Thread: So, is it ok to start out as a hobbyist to learn the ropes?

  1. #16
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    Yes, what one actually wants/needs to do will influence what specific software is best suited. I was just indicating in what you quoted that based on what I know of Dennis's work now and intended, it's "likely" that Aspire will handle 3D modeling well at whatever point he is ready for that. But things do change and he or anyone else has to carefully select what software best addresses the work at hand.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    The nice thing about Vectric software is you can download a trial version and learn it svae the files and then when you purchase it you can use those files.

  3. #18
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    I am working on gathering money for my first machine. It won't be what I really want, but due to funding, it will be what I can at least get started with. I also want to start with VCarve software. I'm strong in Sketchup drawing as well as DeltaCAD software. I've always thought it cool to be able to tie my computer drawings into a machine to make parts/pieces. Maybe I'm crazy, but my desire is to tie both of my skills together to hopefully make something that is meaningful and money making. But.....I also expect this to take me a while to learn. I've played with Aspire a bit and like it. But that too, is another large expense that I'll have to plan for.
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
    Get the Benefits of Being an SMC Contributor..!
    ....DEBT is nothing more than yesterday's spending taken from tomorrow's income.

  4. #19
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    Dennis, VCarve Pro and Aspire are identical outside of the latter has the 3D modeling capabilities. At the point you decide you want those, the transition is seamless...I did that in January...outside of the pesky payment of the difference in cost.


    You're going to love having a CNC machine in your shop!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Tucson, Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Peacock View Post
    I am working on gathering money for my first machine. It won't be what I really want, but due to funding, it will be what I can at least get started with. I also want to start with VCarve software. I'm strong in Sketchup drawing as well as DeltaCAD software. I've always thought it cool to be able to tie my computer drawings into a machine to make parts/pieces. Maybe I'm crazy, but my desire is to tie both of my skills together to hopefully make something that is meaningful and money making. But.....I also expect this to take me a while to learn. I've played with Aspire a bit and like it. But that too, is another large expense that I'll have to plan for.
    Hi Dennis,
    VCarve Pro (and Aspire) are both great programs, but don't overlook Fusion 360. I like it and use it quite a bit for cnc routing and plasma cutting on my shop built machine. VCarve Pro is around $800 (Aspire around $2000), and Fusion 360 is free. I own and use Aspire/VCarve - they are very capable programs. I also use MasterCAM for my cnc turning and machining centers, as well as DesignEdge for my PlasmaCAM cnc plasma cutting and engraving machines. There are budget cnc machines available in the $300 to $400 dollar range that would lend themselves well for your training. I would suggest that you consider an entry level machine with appropriate software to start you cnc learning experience. I actually built my first cnc wood router from scratch - the cost was around $800 including the controller. I am not suggesting that you do that. But it just shows that is is possible to get into the "game" at a reasonable cost.
    David

    Shop Built cnc wood router.jpg
    Last edited by David Buchhauser; 07-29-2019 at 7:02 AM.

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