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Thread: Anchoring outdoor faucets to brick or block walls

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM
    Posts
    1,662

    Anchoring outdoor faucets to brick or block walls

    What's a good way to anchor an outdoor faucet (hose bib) to a brick or block wall?

    The arrangements I've seen depend on the rigidity of the pipes to hold the faucets still. That's ok for galvanized pipe and perhaps for copper pipe, but what do you do if the supply pipe is PEX? Hose bibs designed to be anchored with screws don't work well for masonry. Drilling holes for anchors so close apart can crack the brick.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    TX / LA border.. Toledo Bend
    Posts
    706
    I agree w you that the flanges and mounting hole c-c is a problem w masonry.

    Some ideas below.

    Marc

    .https://www.google.com/search?q=hose...w=1229&bih=604
    I'm pretty new here, not as as experienced as most. Please don't hesitate to correct me

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    TX / LA border.. Toledo Bend
    Posts
    706
    I'm pretty new here, not as as experienced as most. Please don't hesitate to correct me

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,988
    I use Greenlee caulking anchors. If the 1-1/8" hole for the pipe hasn't been drilled yet, drill the small holes first.

    Here is a link for the anchors. This page will show the anchors with the pound-in tool. I don't use the pound-in tool. With that method of insertion, the hole has to be close to the perfect depth, and also the machine screw the right length.

    After looking at this page link, click on the "screw expander". Using the screw expander, the anchor is screwed onto the end of the expander, inserted in the hole, and the knurled knob tightened to expand the anchor. It sets it flush with the outside surface, so drill the hole deeper than you need it, and screw length is not so much of an issue. I put some construction adhesive on the anchor before putting it in the hole, and don't tighten too much to break the little pieces of masonry left.

    The trouble with those expanders is that they are expensive. I've managed to find all the different sizes on ebay. I use the smaller ones for chimney flashing, as seen on the Chimney Flashing page on my website.

    If the 1-1/8" hole has already been used, don't use a hammer drill to drill the small holes, or it will surely explode between the small holes, and the larger one.

    https://www.greenlee.com/us/en/caulking-anchors

    To get beyond this problem altogether, if possible, and the house is over a crawlspace, I exit the hose bibs on the outside wall behind a bathroom, or kitchen sink cabinet, and any future replacement can be done much easier than crawling under the house.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
    Posts
    1,257
    I used a scrap piece of aluminum to make a mounting plate, very similar to the one in the youtube video. I just used ordinary anchors to mount the plate to the concrete wall. The mounting plate means the mounting holes are far enough apart that there was no cracking of the cement.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  6. #6
    I have used two-hole pipe hangers and tapcon anchors. I love tapcon anchors. Living in a masonry house I use them for everything from hanging pictures to installing cabinets.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,340
    I make a plate from pressure treated wood and caulk it to the brick and then just mount the hose bib to it. Worked out very well for ten years and still going fine.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,909
    Metal pipe with molten lead or sulfur. transition to pex inside.
    Bill D

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