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Thread: Getting rid of rust inside table-saw cabinet

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    Getting rid of rust inside table-saw cabinet

    Any thoughts/suggestions for killing the rust inside a table saw cabinet? Looks like something spilled at the table/wing joint and ran down inside my Powermatic 66 table saw some years ago. Iíve scraped away most of it with the table and wings removed and it hasnít gone all the way through the sheet metal. Iíve seen rust converter solutions online and thought that might be an answer before I reading that area. Any help would be appreciated!

  2. #2
    I've used POR-15 with success on automotive. The first time I used it about two days later I was able to peel it off in a sheet. Sheepishly I must say, it is a process and when I followed it, the product worked great.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Hi Peter,
    This is a product that I have been using for over 30 years for automotive restoration applications. It eliminates any sanding or scraping and converts the rust to a paintable surface. I usually buy it at the local ACE hardware store.
    David

    https://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-78...gateway&sr=8-4

    rust-oleum rust reformer.jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    I would just scrape and wire brush off the scale, then hit it with hot water from the garden hose to make sure any residual acid, base or salt is washed off, then hit it with rusty metal primer.

  5. #5
    The product David shows seems to be akin to Ospho, works well. "Converts rust to " (something else). Works well.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    The product David shows seems to be akin to Ospho, works well. "Converts rust to " (something else). Works well.
    Hi Mel,
    I have used both products (Ospho and Rust Reformer). I would prefer to use the Rust Reformer for this table saw application. On the occasions that I have used Ospho, it has usually left a white chalky residue which I had to remove before painting. These were sandblasted parts, so perhaps the residue from the media (sand) had something to do with it. I have also used muriatic acid (swimming pools acid) to treat rusted areas with good results. I would also agree with Jacob's suggestion to use a "Rusty Metal Primer" to treat the problem area (after scraping/wire-brushing/cleaning).
    David

  7. #7
    David,I've noticed the chalkiness but it's usually more color than loose powder. I just brushed it or wiped it according to
    situation. Always been happy with the durability of the usually following Rustoleum products.

  8. #8
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    Austin, TX
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    +1 for Rust Reformer. I used that on some outdoor iron pipes and it worked great.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  9. #9
    Ospho (phosporic acid)

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    You didn't say how much area it is, how easy it is to get to, or how deep the rust is. I did understand that it's all on the inside? If it's easy to get to, and not too deep, I'd skip the chemicals, and just sand it down to bare metal with a fine grade, flap sanding disk, on a 4-1/2" side grinder.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Forney-6...1924/302737102 I've never used a double sided one, but this will give you an idea. There are a number of grits to choose between.
    Last edited by Tom M King; 07-24-2019 at 3:47 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    Sorry for the delay in replying, we went out of town for a family visit. I picked up the Rust Reformer and tried it out on a couple of items to great effect. I have now taken everything apart and out of the cabinet to clean and re-paint and have the cabinet ready to be treated, stripped and repainted. It may not be a perfect match to 60ís Powermatic Green, but it is darn close and close enough for me. Because we no longer have any oil-based paints here in California, I picked up an Industrial acrylic paint from my local Sherwin-Williams paint store. Right off the batt, I noticed that once it dried, the primer stuck tenaciously to whatever it got on, like my hands, a drip on my shoe, etc. Very impressive! Looks great on the underside of the wing extensions. The Leeson motor now has new bearings, and the capacitor covers are back into shape and weather-sealed with weatherstripping to keep the dust out. Waiting on a new external fan blade to replace the one that was cracked from an earlier motor drop I found when it came out of the cabinet.
    Thank you all for your suggestions and advice on getting this beauty back to making sawdust!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    It sounds like your saw is ready for another sixty years. They were great saws. Glad to hear that another one has survived & in the right hands.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Bovey View Post
    I picked up the Rust Reformer and tried it out on a couple of items to great effect. !
    Hi Peter,
    Glad to hear that the Rust Reformer worked out for you. I have been using it for many years and have always achieved great results.
    David

  14. #14
    Ignore the rust. Spilt milk and all.

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