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Thread: Thinking about upgrading to a sliding table saw

  1. #1

    Thinking about upgrading to a sliding table saw

    I currently have a Jet Xacta saw and it's been working fine for me, but I find myself wishing I had a sliding fence for larger panels, as well as having a scoring blade for cleaner cuts on the underside.

    Assuming I could resell the saw for a (relatively) fair value as used machine, an upgrade to a sliding saw would be affordable without too much strain.

    The question I find myself wondering, is would I miss having the cabinet saw? (I don't have room for both, not to mention there isn't budget for both)

    This wouldn't have occurred to me except for a comment I recently heard in a Mike Farrington youtube video, that he breaks down sheet goods on his sliding saw, but still cuts them to final size on his cabinet saw.

    For those of you with limited space, and assuming cost wasn't really an issue, would you prefer a cabinet saw or a sliding table saw? Are there things you find easier/better on a cabinet saw?

    Thanks for any insight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Jeff. Things that are great on a slider: Straight line ripping solid stock to get a straight edge. Crosscutting lumber to exact lengths. Cutting up panel material to square and precise sizes. About the only thing that I like my cabinet saw for now is ripping narrow strips and dado cuts. I also sometimes use it just because it is closer to me than my slider. The scoring blade is great for veneer face plywood and melamine. So do you need a slider ? Probably not,however they are nice. They also take up a lot of floor space,depending on the size of machine you get. I would check out some of the smaller short stroke sliders like a Hammer k3 or the Minimax Sc2 or Sc3. I owned a Minimax Sc2 for a while and loved it,sometimes I wish I had kept it, however I do not need two sliders. The guy who cuts his plywood pieces to final size on a cabinet saw either does not know what he is doing or he does not have his slider set up well. It should be far easier to cut up pieces accurately on his slider. Final notes if I could only have one it would definitely be a slider.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Central WI
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    I have a bunch of sliding saws and like either 10' or longer, or 39-49" short stroke. Have you seen the MM SC2 on Woodweb in Wis? Still in crate. Dave

  4. #4
    Thanks.

    I plan on going down the Felder showroom in Anaheim to see the machines in person. Iíll get a better idea of the space requirements.

    The SCM one for resale looks interesting. How does the $4500 heís asking for compare to a brand new one just off the assembly line?

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Jeffrey, hopefully to put your mind at rest, the slider section may be locked in place, and then the saw is used in the exactly same manner as a standard table saw (cutting against a rip fence). In other words, you get two saws for the price of one.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    I've owned a short stroke saw/shaper since 2010, there's absolutely no way I would o back to a cabinet saw.

    The capacity, capability and accuracy are outstanding.

    Mine had dado capability, I use it a fair amount of time. I also have a stock feeder on a flip up bracket, boy does the saw make perfect rips once a human isn't feeding it.

    Most of the time my outrigger is hanging on the wall, the saw is smaller than my previous cabinet saw, yet if I need the outrigger it pops on in a minute.

    For me, crosscutting a sheet of ply is as large a slider as I need......Rod.

  7. #7
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    I hate them. I hate having to have a jig or fixture to rip lumber ( plus limited on length for that) I hate leaning over them to try to rip lumber. No thank you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    I enjoy having a short stroke slider. I have all of about 20 minutes on a cabinet saw in my lifetime so I have no mental comparison, I use a bandsaw for ripping a planer for making parallel and a slider for crosscuts.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #9
    Jeffrey,

    I looked at one a few years ago and after I realized what the work zone requirements are I had to look at other options. Even though I have a decent sized shop, I couldn't justify the footprint. My main reason for one was crosscutting sheet goods & straightling ripping an edge on dimensional lumber.

    Ultimately I decided a track saw could do both of these, and was the best answer for me.

    One thing I heard Farrington mention is ripping against the fence on the slider is a bit awkward. That is why he kept the conventional tablesaw.

    .

  10. #10
    I imagine the online photos don't really do the size justice.

    Could anyone tell me the footprint required for a sliding table saw with an outrigger?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I did the move from an Xacta Saw to a slider quite a few years ago now...zero looking back! Yes, there is a little learning curve for some things and some jigs that come in handy. But there is so much to like about using a true slider. (There are also many threads here with previous discussion that you might find helpful)

    For footprint, there are two things you need to look at...the outrigger which is to the left of the blade and the wagon stroke. My 8'6" stroke SCM/Minimax S315WS requires 19' for end to end travel of the wagon. The outrigger is about 5', give or take hanging off the wagon. I my shop, the spot where my slider and J/P occupy, things were a bit tight, so I cut down the right side table by 16" to get more space.

    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    I hate them. I hate having to have a jig or fixture to rip lumber ( plus limited on length for that) I hate leaning over them to try to rip lumber. No thank you.
    I use the rip fence mostly for ripping, I can rip the same length piece as I can on a cabinet saw. I can also straight line rip if I want.

    Short stroke sliders have the same ergonomics as a cabinet saw, no leaning over.............Rod.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    You probably noticed Darcy has a different opinion than many owners. I recall a recent forum post where the person had kept the cab-saw for everything except cross cuts which went to the slider. Just food for thought.
    I am familiar with modern idioms but they are outside the vocabulary of what I want to say.

    - George Dyson (composer)

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey Kretz View Post
    I imagine the online photos don't really do the size justice.

    Could anyone tell me the footprint required for a sliding table saw with an outrigger?
    Hi, I've included a drawing of mine, which is the saw/shaper so it's very slightly larger than the saw.

    This is for the 51" version.

    It takes up less space than my old General cabinet saw as it doesn't need an out feed table normally and the outrigger is normally removed.

    The sliders don't need any more space if you buy a small one, you do however need the same space for infeed and outfeed of wood.

    I would estimate that my outrigger is about 36". I can measure it if you want.

    Hammer 51 inch B3.pdf

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
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    I have both, use both, and like both. If I had to keep one, it might be the slider, but i wouldnt be overjoyed by the decision. I have come to really enjoy the ease of dead on crosscuts off the slider. 90% of my furniture joinery is done via the domino, and it doesnt get much better than the combo of perfectly square and equally sized parts followed up by 5-10 mins with the Df700. a 10' machine is probably the best "if you had to have only one" machine. I very rarely rip anything over 10'.

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