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Thread: Which Bench Grinder?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    The one I want is not made yet. In the meantime, I get by with this one, but would recommend getting a half speed grinder, instead of this full speed one. I like them smooth. Several other brands were returned before I found this one. It was running several minutes like this, while I went to the truck, and came back with the camera.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #17
    I have a half speed grinder that was sold by woodcraft about ten years ago. Has two white wheels, which have worked fine with improvised tool rests. One note is that performance improved considerably when I balanced the wheels by rotating one of them (probably not an issue for the CBN wheels).
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
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    4,423
    The DELTA bench grinder is good one ..I also have a slow speed, a WORKSHARP and a Tormek...Delta good for everyday use.
    Jerry

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    7,703
    Was in Lowes this morning, running errands ( bandsaw blade, paint brushes...) and walked past their selection of grinders, at least the Delta ones...

    Plain & simple dual wheel 6" grinder...$59
    fancier variable speed, 6" duak wheel grinder....$99
    The 8" version of the variable speed grinder ( even has a light?)..$149?

    Didn't see much in the way of wheels for the grinders, though..

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
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    4,423
    Thinking when i replace my current Delta bench grinder, I'd add variable speed...is this is a useful feature? Also do you find moving up to an 8" wheel worthwhile? Thanks.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
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    6,449
    Jerry, I have never used a variable speed grinder. Mine is a half-speed (1450 rpm). At times it is still faster than I would prefer, even with a CBN wheel. A variable speed may take it lower. If not, then do not waste your money.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Charles View Post
    I have a half speed grinder that was sold by woodcraft about ten years ago. Has two white wheels, which have worked fine with improvised tool rests. One note is that performance improved considerably when I balanced the wheels by rotating one of them (probably not an issue for the CBN wheels).
    Hello Christopher, could you be more specific exactly what you've done?

    Having watched some youtubes years ago on bench grinder tuning, It didn't feel like it was worth the hassle, but have since acquired a full speed 8" grinder which vibrates
    like mad, when left coast to a stop.
    So much so, warranted a base to be welded up for it and the drill quickly, and for it to be clamped down.

    Hoping you have a good link or video.
    Any info appreciated
    Thanks

    Tom

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    1,304
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Olexa View Post
    Thinking when i replace my current Delta bench grinder, I'd add variable speed...is this is a useful feature? Also do you find moving up to an 8" wheel worthwhile? Thanks.
    I find the variable speed very handy. Slow speed on the soft wheel to establish primary edges on chisels and plane irons. High speed on the hard wheel for lawnmower blades, metal shaping, etc.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Trees View Post
    ... but have since acquired a full speed 8" grinder which vibrates like mad, when left coast to a stop.
    So much so, warranted a base to be welded up for it and the drill quickly, and for it to be clamped down.
    Tom, it sounds like you have one of two problems - bad bearings (easy to replace in most grinders) or unbalanced wheels. Checking and replacing either (or both) of those might go a long way to fixing the vibration in your grinder.

    Patrick

  10. #25
    Hi Tom,

    I agree with Patrick that it is one or the other (imbalanced wheels or bad bearings). The (imperfect) way to balance the wheels is to put a mark on both and then rotate one 1/4 turn in relation to the other (to change the net balance between them). Turn on, test, and repeat until it gets as good as it gets. Make sense?

    Since you're not truly balancing each wheel, perfection is unlikley Mine is not perfect, but very usable for my needs. I suspect the lower end models come with cheap wheels that may each be poorly balanced--you could remove one wheel and test to see if one of the two wheels is especially out of balance.

    Good luck!
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,868
    One of the grinders that I bought, and sent back, was a big Dewalt. It had a vibration too, but was traced it to a shaft with a LOT of runout. It was in a pretty safe looking box, and the box wasn't beat up, so it must have gone through quality control like that. I just wrote those off the list.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    19,504
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    It was in a pretty safe looking box, and the box wasn't beat up, so it must have gone through quality control like that.
    One often made mistake is seeing the packer's sign off and thinking that is the QC check list. It is just an assurance that all the items that were supposed to be in the box were in the box.

    100% testing of each individual product off an assembly line by the quality control department is not practiced for any consumer item to my knowledge.

    Quality control uses statistical analysis. Usually 10 (or some predetermined number) items of a manufacturing lot of 100 to 1,000 will be checked. If all 10 pass then it is assumed they are all the same. If one fails then the whole lot goes back for rework.

    Some manufactured items go through a system of multiple tests throughout the manufacturing process. These are usually adjustment stages to bring the product into the range of the 'published specifications.' Some manufacturers may allow for more vibration or other 'defects' than others.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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