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Thread: Corded vs cordless trim routers

  1. #1
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    Corded vs cordless trim routers

    I was using my Makita RT0700C corded trim router yesterday to remove the waste from (handcut) dovetail sockets ...




    I really like this router. It is light and powerful. The soft start is excellent and the dust control is brilliant (the Mirka 27mm antistatic hose is tapered at the end and fits perfectly. It is light and flexible). I have had thoughts about the cordless version.

    It occurred to me that the vacuum cleaner I use, a Festool CT26E, uses an auto on-off switch, which is powered by the router (or any other power tool). This would not work with a cordless router. Is there an alternate way to auto switch for a cordless?




    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  2. #2
    Yeah, I automatically turn around and switch the dust extractor to manual.

    Sorry.......

  3. #3
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    Well, Festool has "solved" that issue by including a Bluetooth connection from the tool to the vacuum. Rather than modifying the tools, they put the bluetooth radio in the battery.

    But I don't get it. The point of a cordless tool is that you're not dragging power cable around. If you're still tethered to the vacuum by the dust hose, losing the power cable doesn't help much.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    But I don't get it. The point of a cordless tool is that you're not dragging power cable around. If you're still tethered to the vacuum by the dust hose, losing the power cable doesn't help much.
    I agree. Any tool that needs to have a vacuum hose attached is automatically not going to be battery powered in my shop.

  5. #5
    As Jamie said, you can get this:
    https://www.festoolproducts.com/fest...xtractors.html

    and it doesn't even require the Festool batteries - just put that remote button on the end of your hose.

    I have it and use it for things like hand sanding blocks that are hooked to the festool hose. But I agree that I don't see the point of a cordless router tied to a corded vacuum.

    Now, if you wanted to switch to a different shade of green, you could get the Makita cordless vacuum
    https://www.makitatools.com/products/details/XCV15ZX

  6. #6
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    I would be really impressed if they made a hoseless vacuum to attach to the cordless router

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    I would be really impressed if they made a hoseless vacuum to attach to the cordless router
    Sounds dangerous, I mean aren't you just describing a mini black hole, sucking in all directions?

    I also don't get the cordless shop vacs. I'm guessing they make a lot of sense for people who are working on job sites without access to any sort of power. (The hand held ones are an exception, since they're just nice for cleaning up small spills)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    Sounds dangerous, I mean aren't you just describing a mini black hole, sucking in all directions?

    I also don't get the cordless shop vacs. I'm guessing they make a lot of sense for people who are working on job sites without access to any sort of power. (The hand held ones are an exception, since they're just nice for cleaning up small spills)
    Here's a lesson on the foolishness of messing with mini black holes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvvgdXKrd7g

    We use cordless vacs at work for things like when you have to work on top of an aerial work platform, or a tight space & power and/or working space are limited. The Milwaukee M18 toolbox vac is a pretty impressive piece. I also use one to inflate our big inflatable island when we go to the lake. But for the home shop it makes not sense to me.

  9. #9
    The router base with dust collection looks great. Did you make that?

    Jay

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    I was using my Makita RT0700C corded trim router yesterday to remove the waste from (handcut) dovetail sockets ...




    I really like this router. It is light and powerful. The soft start is excellent and the dust control is brilliant (the Mirka 27mm antistatic hose is tapered at the end and fits perfectly. It is light and flexible). I have had thoughts about the cordless version.

    It occurred to me that the vacuum cleaner I use, a Festool CT26E, uses an auto on-off switch, which is powered by the router (or any other power tool). This would not work with a cordless router. Is there an alternate way to auto switch for a cordless?




    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Kepley View Post
    The router base with dust collection looks great. Did you make that?

    Jay
    Thanks Jay. Yes I did.

    Pretty easy. You can purchase Lexan (brand name for polycarbonate) on eBay. I think that this is 10mm. Leave the protective film on, draw the shape and bandsaw it. Use the router base as a template. Drill the hole, and mark and drill the screw holes. I turned the handle. You can purchase them easily. It is a fun project, and a few bucks will allow you to make several different types.



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #11
    Agreed, a cordless tool hooked up to a corded vacuum seems pointless. Now, if it were a cordless vacuum and you were someplace without electrical service, you might have something.

  12. #12
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    If I was done building out my tool arsenal, and had excess funds, i think the Festool boom arm helps to solve the cord/hose issue much better than the notion of a cordless trim router in this case. To the tune of $375, however, I will keep it on the wish list.

    As a counterpoint, I've found that for many tasks appropriate for a trim router, trading the dust produced from a small 1/8" chamfer for being completely cordless is often one i'll gladly take. You may not realize it, but when routing a long length of an edge, your brain does seem to consider the cord more than you realize. The freedom that comes from chamfering an entire face frame or a long edge of a board without having to consider where and when the cord will snag is quite noticeable.

    Routing the waste on dovetails, however, doesn't require the same relative scale of motion -- that is, it's confined to a relatively small area where the limitations of a cord aren't a factor. This is where the Festool boom arm, for instance, makes sense.

    As has been said previously, a dust collection hose negates just about all the benefits from going cordless for my applications.

  13. #13
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    But I don't get it. The point of a cordless tool is that you're not dragging power cable around. If you're still tethered to the vacuum by the dust hose, losing the power cable doesn't help much.
    True enough - - but - - reportedly, the cordless (at least the Makita) compact router has more power than the corded version.

    There's also the times that there isn't enough electric to go around - either in the form of plugs or sufficient amperage to run two tools.

    And - - speaking from the perspective of a person that recently cut the cord of his Bosch jigsaw in half - - there's also that ....
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  14. #14
    Thanks Derek. Did you make the dust collection outlet?

  15. #15
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    Jay, that is a standard part of the Makita. The dust control is fantastic. The hose is a Mirka 27mm. I purchased this for a Mirka Ceros ROS, and it fits the Makita outlet perfectly. The hose is light and flexible, and antistatic. I have a Festool 27mm as well, however this has a different end (for Festool tools) and is heavier than the Mirka hose.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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