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Thread: DC pipe layout critique needed

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    DC pipe layout critique needed

    Attached are three layouts for pipe runs in my new basement shop. DC is a CV1800 and i’ll run 5” PVC pipe. Machine layout is probably 90% accurate, meaning there will be minor changes like likely swapping the position of the DP and big BS.

    Major machine drops will be to the jointer, RAS, BS/DS area, and planer/TS. Having a run that goes across the TS blade would be nice for a future drop to an over the blade DC setup a la Shark Guard.

    All change of directions will be with 45’s or long radius 90’s, whichever are available.

    I’ll have wyes with caps at most turns to allow for future, such as at the jointer where I could pipe to the large for example, or over the bench for a sanding drop.

    Please review the drawings and and let me know what you all think.
    Thanks!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    The first drawing is probably the easiest to build; the third is maybe slightly more efficient, but probably isn't necessary with your, cyclone, pipe size, and short runs. Myself, I'd do the first drawing, the other two with the angles look hard to do in the real world.

  3. #3
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    With that collector, you can afford to choose easier to install routing, but 5" is too small for a 5 HP collector is it not? I ran 8" trunks with my 5 HP system & it certainly is not too large.

  4. #4
    Any reason you are using 5" PVC rather than 6" PVC for ducts? 5" is kind of an odd ball size, with fittings and pipe not as readily available at your local Menards, HD, etc vs 6" If you really want 5", it might almost be easier to order it in spiral galvanized.

  5. #5
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    Thank you for the suggestion on the pipe size, I hadn’t thought about it. I think when I talked to CV back in December they said 5” would be fine and cheaper. But I’m fine running 6” if it’s readily available (pipe and fittings). I could also run 6” “mains” then step down as needed.

    I agree the first layout seems the simplest to put together.

    Any suggestions on leveling out the 7° bend that goes up from the CV? Short piece of flex?

  6. #6
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    6" thinwall PVC should be much more readily available, and cheaper, than 5".

  7. #7
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    You should be able to get the the 6" DWV pipe and fittings at Menards at a reasonable cost. That is where I got mine for my 5 hp DC.

  8. #8
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    Number two is my choice...

    And finding PVC/ABS in "odd" number sizes is a tough row to hoe... ...go with a 6" main for plastic.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    A 7 degree bend would go away nicely with a piece of flex. Plus it makes a good vibration damper and convenient way to get in the ducting if necessary.

  10. #10
    I think any of them will work. I like #3.

    Definitely go with 6" ducts.

    I used the sewer & drain type PVC. Screw and tape joints do not glue!!

  11. #11
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    I prefer spiral duct & fittings. I especially like the long sweep elbows that you can get in metal. Having no static electricity to make dust cling & give off the occasional wake up zap is also a bonus in the dry climate here.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Seemann View Post
    A 7 degree bend would go away nicely with a piece of flex. Plus it makes a good vibration damper and convenient way to get in the ducting if necessary.
    True from a convenience standpoint, but in general flex is best to avoid as much as possible, especially in a main line. It's necessary on drops, but even there, best practice is to minimize the length of any flex. Even so-called "smooth interior" flex has a lot more resistance than any kind of hard duct including sweeps.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. You could heat up the pipe with a torch or heat blanket to put the 7 degree bend in it. do it all the time with electrical pvc. You have be careful because it burns easily though

  14. #14
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    Thanks Ray. I’ve read up a bit on bending pvc and it looks promising. But has anyone here done it on 6” thinwall pipe?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    Thanks Ray. I’ve read up a bit on bending pvc and it looks promising. But has anyone here done it on 6” thinwall pipe?
    It's going to be tough to do without forms. You might be successful getting just a 7* bend though. The larger the diameter and the thinner the wall, the harder it is to bend without collapsing the pipe.

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