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Thread: Squaring Up Really Long Boards... Tips?

  1. #46
    I've heard this lots, pity it doesn't work for regluing popped guitar bridges IME,
    I would stick to waterproof PVA type, like titebond ( "2" I think) for the job.
    Tom

  2. #47
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    Have 5 Ash 1 x 6s to make into a desk top...
    Computer desk top, 5 blanks trimmed.JPG
    If you want to watch.....

  3. #48
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    Well I have been called Okie, Texan, Hey You, and many other things. I pretty much answer to all of them.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post

    Though one thing that is great with epoxy is it will fill and hold across gaps.

    jtk
    This is the most important reason for my love of epoxy.
    As skills in cutting joinery get refined, Titebond works equally good and cheaper.

    One other thing I like about epoxy is the open time. I use System III T-88 epoxy.
    Its easily usable up to 30-40 minutes (I think Gel time is 1 hour).
    Even after glue up, minor adjustments can be done for another 20-30 minutes.


    Side note:

    I like Titebond III. It made me realize how strong is a glue joint. Before that "joint is stronger than wood" was just theory I read on internet and never fully believed.
    A year back, I glued ~10 2ft x 2" x 0.75" strips of wood to make a panel. Panel ended up bowed so I threw it. Later it ended up as ramp for lawn mower (on a step).
    Essentially panel has stayed outside, in ground contact, stepped on, seen rain, frost and all kind of Seattle weather for 1 year.
    Center wood strip split in two half's lengthwise few months back - not at the glue line but the wood itself.
    It looks terrible but none of the glue joints have broken. Both the halves are chugging along.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Have 5 Ash 1 x 6s to make into a desk top...
    Computer desk top, 5 blanks trimmed.JPG
    If you want to watch.....
    Following.

  6. #51
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    Austin, TX
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    Well, I've got the last of my giant panels in the clamps tonight. That is 6 panels of 27-32" width, and 12' length. I've certainly increased my skill in leveling the glued up panels with handplanes. However, not increased enough.

    I ultimately worked through them with a #5 Jack set to take an aggressive cut. I worked across the grain (perpendicular) and there were plane tracks and tearout aplenty. I tried cleaning these up with my #8 Jointer but using it like I've seen in videos set for a moderately aggressive cut .005" it was hard to push. Too hard for the most part.
    I tried finishing up with my #4 smoother, but it just wouldn't take much of a shaving anywhere. I guess I left the surface to rough. Not getting anything but little nibs off of a 12' panel meant I had to advance the blade to get a shaving, but once it started to bite, it bit too deep and wasn't really doing the job of preparing the surface for finishing. At least, I'd have been at it for months it felt like...

    So I grabbed my RO sander and went at it with 40/80/100/150 grit. Things looked decent enough to me, but when we put the stain on the first two sections last night, there were tool marks and some tearout all over the place. Now, I like this look for certain things. But it wasn't what I was going for. Too late now, Nothing to do but forge ahead. The two parter panel just done (1/3rd of the project) was the "back bar". So not super customer visible. Not critical.

    I went out an purchased white oak for the front bartop sections (the remaining four). I think I did a better job cleaning up the rough tool marks, but will see when the stain goes on tomorrow.

    PS - I have two of the "panels" still to flatten/touch up. Tonight the screw holding down the front handle of the #5 snapped. It is a recent make of Stanley plane (bought in 2000's new). Not sure how to get the broken screw out of the shaft... that was kind of disappointing.

    PPS - I guess tomorrow I'll press into service my Veritas #6 bevel up fore plane and see if I can convince it to sub in for the #5 to get the surface flattened.

  7. #52
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    I tried cleaning these up with my #8 Jointer but using it like I've seen in videos set for a moderately aggressive cut .005" it was hard to push. Too hard for the most part.
    One suggestion is to rub some wax on the sole of the plane to help it glide on the surface. If it is still hard to push, you may need to sharpen the blade or take a lighter shaving.

    I tried finishing up with my #4 smoother, but it just wouldn't take much of a shaving anywhere. I guess I left the surface to rough. Not getting anything but little nibs off of a 12' panel meant I had to advance the blade to get a shaving, but once it started to bite, it bit too deep and wasn't really doing the job of preparing the surface for finishing.
    The #4 is taking off the tops of the 'hills & valleys' left by the cross grain planing. The shavings will get longer as the tops of the 'hills' become high plateaus.

    There may be other problems with the #4. One could be the blade not being sharp. The other could be a plane sole keeping the blade from engaging the wood until it is advanced significantly. Then when the blade engages it digs into the wood. If you have a straight edge this can be easily checked.

    Yesterday a plane being prepped for my grandson wouldn't take a shaving pushing the plane forward with no downward pressure. It would take a 0.0009" shaving if the plane was pressed against the wood. A straight edge, in this case the ruler from a combo square, helped to locate a high spot. A few minutes of 'treatment' on a flat surface with an abrasive sheet across the sole let us get a fine shaving closer to 0.0006" without pressing down on the plane body.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    One suggestion is to rub some wax on the sole of the plane to help it glide on the surface. If it is still hard to push, you may need to sharpen the blade or take a lighter shaving.
    I used some oil (bought it at a Lie-Neilson show), wow, what a difference a little wipe of the oil made.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    There may be other problems with the #4. One could be the blade not being sharp. The other could be a plane sole keeping the blade from engaging the wood until it is advanced signific
    I just freshly sharpened the blade. It is super sharp. I didn't double check the sole. But I went through the flattening ritual when I bought it 15 or so years ago.

    Probably just too many high spots from the rough work left behind by the #5 and the scrub plane.

  9. #54
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    Did anyone happen to think about running a groove along all the edges, then insert a plywood spline?

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Did anyone happen to think about running a groove along all the edges, then insert a plywood spline?
    I've been super busy with day job. But I intend to get out to the lumberyard to purchase another three boards for this tomorrow (well today as I type this).
    I think I may try domino'ing the boards to help lining up the top edge. Might as well give it a go. I'm learning stuff with this project.

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erich Weidner View Post
    I think I may try domino'ing the boards to help lining up the top edge. Might as well give it a go. I'm learning stuff with this project.
    Have you employed "cauls" for the same purpose?

    With a layer of plastic film (such as Saran wrap) overlayed, they can work wonders on panels.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011...great-glue-ups

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    Have you employed "cauls" for the same purpose?

    With a layer of plastic film (such as Saran wrap) overlayed, they can work wonders on panels.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011...great-glue-ups
    Another trick is to put clear packing tape on the cauls. My cauls have been used many times with the same strips of packing tape for the past few years.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #58
    My cauls have wax on the side that touches the boards. I touch it up periodically to be on the safe side. I've never had them stick.

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